Tuesday, January 6, 2009

Current Future Trends in IT

Post your comments or questions here.

114 comments:

IT for Rural Development said...

i really like the movie and i really appreciate the work of the software engineer..when he create Artificial Intelligence..S1mone

adde said...

hi mis gud day...

Simone movie is so very nice nga nkta ko...I realy like most those movie on how it will admire those scene.




by:adde "KERAY" salimbot

IT for Rural Development said...

i really like the movie and i really appreciate the work of the software engineer when he create the Artificial Intelligence S1MONE...

-------Cris Bautista-----

"jency" said...

Jennisa B. Lomocso BSIT IV-A

SIMONE
The movie is so great... It shows what technology can do to our lives... That through technology, almost nothing is impossible...
Simone is one of the technology's evidence... She can talk, move, cry, do some human gestures, and even movie and concert even though she is only a computer simulation... Thanks to Hank Aleno who invented her and Viktor, her director... Simone live like a normal human being..

chochay said...

hi mis good day,

My only comment for the movie SEM ONE is that very nice movie that suite to our course, in which high technology are recognize with the help of one director named VICTOR. The taping of the film was not on a manual manner but on the voice and photo editing. Hope we can developed software like SEMONE.

joy c said...

Good Day Ma'am!

My reaction to the movie SIMONE is fantastic! I can't help to amaze that gigantic movie. How i wish we will have it in reality, it can contribute specially in the world of industry, a lot.!

Eduard said...

hello...
Simone movie was so good,spectacular movie..i like the instinct of taransky!!

steficals said...

I really appreciate the movie of simone its because of the high technology that can be use and knowledge of Taransky.

jarina said...

Good Day!!!

Lovely G. Jarina BSIT IV-A

.........."SIMONE".............
The Movie entitled "SIMONE" that i've watch yesterday is a very interesting. The technology they used is very high that all of the people in the movie love and interested to watch the work of Victor as a director.
That's all ms...tnx..Godbless!

megan said...

nice story..it is interesting i really appreciate the work and also the efforts of victor to make those movie by using that software.

lourdes

JOHN said...

SIMONE
I Love the movie,through technology, almost nothing is impossible.
Simone is one example of the new technology that we are facing now. She can make things that an ordinary person can do,and many more!
SO THANKS A LOT FOR THE INFO.

lavz said...

The SIMONE or Simulation One is one of the most relevant movies in Current Future Trends,because it really shows the significance of a software used by the intelligent software engineers.It gives us an idea that as time goes by technology will change.SIMONE also shows that we may able to be aware to improve our computer skills.It shows the ability and capacity of a software.

Keor23 said...

hi mis gd pm...ang mahambal kulang ah...
SIMONE movie is so nice It shows what technology can do more...That through technology, almost nothing is impossible...

marj said...

hello miss,
I really like the movie entitled "simone" a lot.I really appreciate every scene that Taranzky used. The technology that he use to have a movie without the real person who acted upon.

Arnel Pabiran Arangco said...

hi!,have a great day....

I really appreciate the movie in titled "S1MONE",because through technology nothing is impossible.

Thats mean a lot to me....thank you!

marj said...

good after ma'am,
I really like the movie "SIMONE" I really appreciate the one who make that kind movie.Simone is very nice movie that are related to our course.
"Elizabeth P. Garido"

Bacaron Sharolyn said...

i enjoy the movie...its really great..

ROSITA said...

Rosita Matandag BSIT 1V-A

Hello mam Good afternoon!This is my comment on the Movie "SIMONE"

The movie implicates the usefulness of Technology in movie making and even making an artist using computer programs.
The character of the movie show a great contribution on the movie it seems that they act their lines in a real way.
The movie encouraging the IT students to discover more about the current Technology and discover the new innovation of computer components.

Romel said...

Hi mis gud day!!!!

Simone Movie was so nice, in reality
its so applicable in our course IT...
You can get lesson and learning about the movie....
thanks....

group out campus teaching said...

Simulation one or S1mone

The movie is so great...I really appreciate the works of a computer...all i can say that there is no impossible in this world if you have knowledge to do something.

danely said...

gud day,
s1mone movie comment:
One of the most awesome movie i have seen.it only show that people will go crazy to a person they adore not knowing if it is real.as an IT it give the courage, inspiration that computer made thing possible..

welvie_kretz said...

Simone embodied the true woman spirit and soul despite of the fame and prestige she had gained from her movies...we could think that she never been greedy and boastful about it, it is because she is just computer-coded! not a real true-fleshed woman with a throbbing heart and a beating heart!

this movie really had a pull and a push for us students to be creative and imaginative in doing things like what the software engineer did,,,creating Simone ( simulation one)!

i like what Hank said, " Arts and Science would be a great marriage!"

rhea bsit4a said...

gud day maam.. Simone movie was so great..cos even shes not real but they love simone so much..simone was one the great technology that human can do,and it may help in our society..ii really appreciate it..also mr.hunk and director victor..

MCIT 412 WEB PUBLISHING said...

hi ma'am have a nice day!!!

SIMONE
this movie was so great!!,i'm very very enjoy with this movie.through our technology we can do anything.Like SIMONE movie,you can have an actor and actress.im very impressive this kind of movie thats all.

Joebeth D. Buenavista said...

Joebeth D. Buenavista BSIT IV-B

MOVIE TITLE: SIMONE OR SIMULATION ONE

SIMONE is a very nice movie and very entertaining by the viewers. all expressions are their weather dramatic or comedy. The Software or Technology used is so nice and very impressive and hich-tech for me. Thanks Ma'am;

MCIT 412 WEB PUBLISHING said...

hi ma'am have a nice day!!!

SIMONE
this movie was so great!!,i'm very very enjoy with this movie.through our technology we can do anything.Like SIMONE movie,you can have an actor and actress.im very impressive this kind of movie thats all.

cecille said...

hi ms.good day!
all i can say Simone movie is so..great..i really appreciate the work of Victor Taransky..It shows that nothing is impossible in technology..Simone is one of the example of a high technology..
Technology is very usefull to us...tnx

cherting said...

Good Day Maam!

I really appreciate the movie "SIMONE". Through technology,the dream of Victor to be successful movie director come true.And Also thanks for Hank that give his excellent idea...a virtual artist that make all people got crazy & happy.

god bless us all!!

cris said...

good day ma'am!!
I really appreciate the movie entitled "S1mone" because it viewed that there is no impossibe when it comes to technology.

li said...

helo mam,it was a nice movie,i did enjoy evry scene.the software engineer was amazing.i want to follow his steps,HEHE,tanx 4 reading mam.mwah!GODBLESS U!!!

aiza said...

heloo... mam.. hapi morningzzz..

i really like th movie SIMONE.. so AMAZING... i really so impress.. i cant believe that there is someone can invent that kind of software... im so proud of him... 8s a great movie... i have nothing to say but.. i really really love it..

tiNgLOpEz said...

Good Day! =')

Indeed, s1mOne is a scientific-great movie as it details and portrays the advancement of technology in today's world.

Simone or computer program driven name as "Simulation one' is somewhat like a natural human being which acts as what normal people do and almost deceived them


ma. Cristina M. Lopez

dario said...

Good Day Ma'am....

All I can say in the movie "SIMONE", it's very great, an amazing story which you can believe or not that would happen in reality. Time goes on maybe we can make also a movie like SIMONE, maybe for many years come.
And I hope we can have or made a movie like SIMONE.

By:Dario J Bucabal BSIT IV-A

GROUPS said...

Hi! Hello!
My Comment at the movie SIMONE is I really appreciate the power of computer through the use of thigh technology. Because by this the director can create a very possible movie that the actor or actress will be manipulate by only one person. This is also creating a very popular person from the trends of technology.

That's all thank you....

GROUPS said...

Hi! Hello!
My Comment at the movie SIMONE is I really appreciate the power of computer through the use of thigh technology. Because by this the director can create a very possible movie that the actor or actress will be manipulate by only one person. This is also creating a very popular person from the trends of technology.

That's all thank you....

From: Cezar Miranda

j6_recs said...

It is very interesting and very nice movie. Simone movie shows that as of now we might face a newest technology .



Jory S. De la Peña

luvrock said...

hi,,,,mis gud day,

i really like the movie "SIMONE" or simulation one....i wish i can make that kind of software....hehehe libre lng mangarap...malay nyohhh.....

by: ronald "ronzskie" solania

marvz on drumz said...

hi'maam GUD DAY!!i have some comments about the movie in titled "SIMONE" It so verry nice movie,i really appreciate the director of this MOVIE" I really like it...!!!

iron_59 said...

Simone is very nice movie and very advance technology. And I really appreciate and impress the work of software engineer.



Felix A. Russiana

G_I_Z_E_L_L_E said...

Gud afternoon maam,

The movie SIMONE is a very interesting movie and I really like when the software engineer work for the movie of SIMONE. The movie also suit in our course in IT in making software programs. And the most I like when watch it , is the new technology using by the director was really amazing....

its ghelzie..

Val"z said...

Simone is a kind of movie that everybody would appreciated for it's uniqueness.From the start,I feel bored but when I continue watching I see the goodness & uniqueness of the movie.I also appreciated the writer of the story.As a whole I really enjoy Simone.....



MEliza R. Gallego BSIT IV-A

the matchless group said...

The movie SIMONE is quite interesting and good.It shows how powerful technology is. Even if this movie is very far from reality but I do hope it really exist. It also shows the uniqueness of a certain computer programs like SIMONE, that you cannot believe it's only a system invented by software engineers.

by: realyn baranggan bsitiv-b

january 15,2009

uez said...

Simone movie is very interesting, and suspense. i really enjoy this movie and i admiring it. I cant imagine that this AI make people obsessed.


Zeus

roldan said...

hi miss,
Simone is a movie that represent the new high technology nowadays.I enjoy watching this movie.
I also appreciate the writer....tnx

wenrez said...

hi ma'am gud day....

The movie Simone is very unique, I really like the movie.I can say that it is very unique because of the technology that they use, that through technology nothing is impossible just like the movie "Simone" Simone can talk, dance, and she can do whatever the gesture of human being,we must thankful to Mr.victor the director and hunk the software engineer...

thank...

emolynx08 said...

hi,
all i can say that,the movie SIMONE is very nice,i really like it...
I've learned so much with this movie, use technology in a right way....

elnamenoso said...

Hi mAam gOod dAy
I really liki the movie entitle SIMONE..It so amazing and a nice movie..i really impress..i can imagine that there is someone can invent that kind of software..

dadivas lice said...

good day ma'am dyreen,

The movie Simone is very interesting it shows that their is no impossible nowadays,their is a moral lesson in this movie technology advancement is very useful and necessary but never use it with bad motives especially in deceiving people because it would harm and hurt other people and you will be abusing the law..Always Do
What is RIGHT and Righteousness!

rchel said...

Simone was a nice movie and it can captured the fun exciting of the Fan's although Victor was lying to all the people all over a Country of that Nation but he can provide happiness to all the fun of SIMONE..

irene said...

hi!...mam,
the movie entitled SIMONE or SIMULATION ONE for me its so great... very amazing...an entertaining and interesting movie...the technology they used is very high tech and I enjoyed it so much...heheh I really love the movie....

Irene Barbas

MIXERS GROUP: said...

simone story if we base it in our true to lyf story it realy help us a lot to make things posible high technology can gives us easy things but we just bear in our mind that we need to use it in a nice and gud way.... in order to gain a better lyf. leona bsit IV-B

jhelane said...

jhelanem
simone movie was great and nice. Today, our world facing the so called technology, and tat technology can make everything possible just like simone. very nice movie.....

MCIT412 WEB PUBLISHING said...

Hello ma'am have a nice day!!!!

Simone movie was really interesting i really appreciate the movie it show how technology can do our lives.

Evangeline said...

Good morning Ma'am,
I really like the movie "Simone" because it is related to our course.I appreciate the one who make that movie.

jen-jen said...

hello! good dAy ma'am!

it's a nice movie that i have seen. amazing! i really appreciate the movie "Simone" and very exciting features .mwuaahh...i like it!

ergalapago said...

hi mis gud day
Simone is a nice movie and interesting because of the story and related in our course

jen-jen said...

hello! good dAy ma'am!
it's a nice movie that i have seen and Amazing! i appreciate the movie "Simone" and very interesting feature. mwuah..i like it!

RhEa SiaRoT PagLiNaWaN said...

When I was seen the movie entitled "SIMONE", i was so amazing because thier technology are very high tech and it was a nice movie.

linskie55@gmail.com said...

hellow miss..

This is may first comment in the 3 movies that I've been seen..The movie,so close..will i have seen the movie so close 5 times already, but i love that movie..really!!i admire the technology that they made..

linskie55@gmail.com said...

hellow miss..

i really like the movie s1mone!!
i like the story of the movie..
its great that the artificial intelligence they created can
act like human..
i really like that movie!!!!

jenny sagal said...

Good day!

The movie "simOne" when I saw in the fisrt place, for me it was boring!!But when the triller comes,I realize its quite intresting..simone is a movie that has a fashion that the veiwers can relate to todays reality in the real world of technology.

chinkz said...

Gud day miSs!",)

SIMONE movie is great, so far! It is a movie refusing to cater to mainstream cinematic expectations.

It brings a big influence to us, as student living in the life full of technology.

In a film such this, the students would be awaiting for Simone to eventually gain self-awareness, take on a life of her own, escape from Viktor. But not so. The character of Simone stays constant from beginning to end. Her every thought, movement and emotion comes from Viktor. But it doesnt matter... As what they've said...
"If the performance is genuine, who cares if the actor is real. ... The only real truth is the work."

grace said...

My reaction to the movie entitled "SIMONE" is an extraordinary kind of film. I really admire the computer programmer because he is very genius.HE created an AI that he name it SIMONE. Through Simone he can express his feeling and what is on his mind. HE earn lots of money,people really love simone because she is very talented,she can be a singer,model and actress. Through this kind of technology people may imitate because they doesn't know that it's a computer program created the computer experts.

analyn said...

hi Ma'am,
Simone is one of the great movies I've seen before.It's nice and I can't imagine where the writer got that idea that he came up with that masterpiece.
Hoping that the kind of hard disk will be real..

febel said...

hellow miss...gud pm her's my short comment...the movie we can say that it is incredible or impossible because through the aid of computer the author can do what he want.In the movie the author show his talent to make his own movie that the person can act or interact or playing as the true character in the story but it is only a program that is made by SIMONE....

grace said...

Keeping up to date with technology for your business without going bankrupt

One of the biggest challenges confronting business owners today is how to stay current with new technology without overextending themselves or even going bankrupt. Current technology seems to change almost on a daily basis leaving business owners with the ongoing dilemma of how to afford updating their systems and still stay profitable. While it is crucial for businesses to stay current with new technology in order to compete in the marketplace it is equally crucial for the same businesses to be able to make money using those technologies. If you are a business owner facing this situation here is some information you should know about keeping up to date with technology for your business without going bankrupt.

1.Research your purchase carefully! Many business owners admit to being swayed by glossy sales presentations or high pressure salesman. Consider the goals of your business and carefully make the decision to purchase new technology only after you are assured that this technology purchase will help further those goals. Be informed about what others are doing in your industry but do not let competitors choices influence your decision entirely as each businesses needs concerning technology are unique to them. Do not be hesitant about shopping around comparing prices and quality in similar products. An informed and thought out purchase of new technology is always a better move than an impulsive and rushed purchase for something new.
2.Consider making a second or even third generation purchase of new technology. There are two reasons for this: often times when companies release a new technology there are problems and glitches that have not been fully worked out and most importantly the price of the product is often at the highest point. Companies will release a product for initial sales and then often bring in a product for further testing and refinement and then re release the same product in a second generation market blitz. By waiting a short time before making a new technology purchase the savvy business owner can often purchase a better version of the technology at a lower price.
3.Consider renting or leasing a new technology before making a final purchase. This allows you to test out a new technology before making a final purchasing commitment and sometimes large cash outlay. You will still be able to benefit fully from the new technology but at much less risk to your bottom line and most importantly profitability. It also allows you to return something much easier if you find this is not the right component to fit into your business plan.
4.Consider sharing the cost of a new technology. Many small to medium sized companies often band together where applicable to share the cost of a new technology. Again this allows these companies to reap the benefits of using a new technology without tying up substantial cash or taking on overwhelming debt in order to benefit. Many trade organizations make this type of sharing available through their memberships. If this is an option for your business it is worth checking out.
5.Consider a "piggy backing option". For many small companies access to new technology is just to cost prohibitive. Many small business owners are finding that through piggy backing large companies resources they are able to gain access to new technology at a much lower cost. For instance: a large manufacturing company may allow a smaller company access to new manufacturing technology during a third shift (generally nighttime hours) for a small fee. This allows the machinery to be fully used and provides tax benefits for the larger company while allowing the smaller company access to newer manufacturing technology at a fraction of purchasing cost.

tiNgLOpEz said...

Some of views in keeping up to date with IT trends:

*LockerGnome

This is a link to a variety of free technology newsletters, in addition to links to a various "tips" for using different operating systems and software products. Examples of newsletters offered include Windows Daily and Webmaster Weekly. Most of the newsletters are published at least once a week.

*E-Newsletters Internet.Com

This site is simply a compendium of dozens of other technology newsletters, most of which are free. With choices such as Javascript Weekly and Silicon Valley, the majority of the newsletters are fairly narrow in scope, but there are many to choose from as well as a few more general news reporters.

*FreeTechMail

This highly organized site refers to itself as "Your search engine for IT newsletters." It provides ratings, information, links to sample issues, and the ability to subscribe for hundreds of IT newsletters. One of the best features is the ability to search for newsletters by keyword, newsletter name, or publisher. Organized like a directory, there are roughly 15 major categories, each of which has various sub-categories, so even though there are hundreds of newsletters listed, it is easy to browse by broad or narrow topic area.

*TechWeb Newsletters

This site list far fewer newsletters, but one thing it does offer is the ability to subscribe to several newsletters from the essential IT industry trade journal, Information Week. It offers, for example, subscriptions for InformationWeek Daily and This Week On InformationWeek.com. So you can find newsletters to provide you with news on a daily or weekly basis. The site offer newsletters on a variety of other IT topics as well. The ability to see a sample issue in inconsistent.

*Woody's Watch

Woody's offers just a few free newsletters, but they are geared to selected Microsoft software products. For example, if you need to keep up with the latest news about the Office suite or just ACCESS or XP, Woody offers a newsletter for it. Why some software, such as Excel, is ignored is unclear. Though it isn't obvious, it is possible to look at their sample issues.

*Support Alert

This is the free edition (there is a premium "fee" version called The Supporters Edition) of a newsletter that provides links to technology news items, links to all sorts of sites with advice on how to make better use of technology, news about new computer utilities, and there are links to sites with computer security updates. It is published about once a month, and there is likely to be at least one item in each edition that will provide a useful tip or tool for just about anyone.

*IT Update

This free weekly newsletter will most likely appeal to the campus CIO or other information technology administrators. It says it is published by the editors of Information Technology Update, which is a fee-based newsletter published by Progressive Business Publications. It likely replicates technology news about viruses and other threats that are published in other computing newsletter, but it appears to be a quick way to keep up with recent developments of interest to IT administrators (and their staffs).

*ComputerWorld IT Newsletters

This well-known IT industry news reporter also makes available a nice range of free newsletters. Two particularly useful ones are the ComputerWorld Daily which is a report on the day's events in IT, and the Weekly Top Ten which is great if you don't have time for the daily report. The Top Ten provides the ten most requested stories from that week as well as other news overviews for the IT industry.


_ma.cristina m.lopez_

tiNgLOpEz said...

- Types of Computer Assisted Interviews -


CAI stands for Computer-Assisted-Interviewing, which refers to the way in which computers can be used in
the development and administering of survey questionnaires. It has also been known as Computer-Assisted
Survey Information Collection (CASIC). Rather than using a paper questionnaire, interviewers carry laptops
from which questions are read out and responses to the survey questions are entered. The data is then
transmitted back to the field centre via modem.


• CAPI (Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing) is used when administering a questionnaire
face-to-face. The interviewer reads questions from the screen (which the respondent cannot usually
see) and responses are typed in to designated fields.
• CATI (Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing) is a similar setup to CAPI and is used in
telephone interviews.
• CASI (Computer Assisted Self Interviewing) is used particularly when questions are of a sensitive
nature, such as crime and offending or sexual behaviour and attitudes. Respondents are given the
laptop and are able to enter their responses themselves. It is thought to increase the validity of
responses, as respondents are more likely to give truthful answers (whilst the interviewer cannot see
what they are doing). such as crime and offending or sexual behaviour and attitudes. Respondents
are given the laptop and are able to enter their responses themselves. It is thought to increase the
validity of responses, as respondents are more likely to give truthful answers (whilst the interviewer
cannot see what they are doing).
• AudioCASI, like CASI allows respondents to enter their responses themselves, without the
interviewer being able to see. Here, the respondent listens to the questions being asked through
headphones, rather than reading them on screen, so nobody present in the room knows what
question has been asked. This is the most “private” mode and is used in surveys that contain
questions of a more sensitive nature.
• PAPI refers to the traditional mode of administering questionnaires – also known as Pencil and Paper Interviewing.


_ma. cristina m.lopez_

dario said...

Conventionl Ways To IT Careers

Career planning can be a daunting journey, but don't be intimidated. You don’t have to accomplish every objective by tomorrow, but you do need to get started.

Accordin to values and Lifesyle

Conventional
Ideals of this type prefer the highly ordered activities, both verbal and numerical, that characterize office work. People scoring high fit well into large organizations but do not seek leadership; they respond to power and are comfortable working in a well-established chain of command. They dislike ambiguous situations, preferring to know precisely what is expected of them. Such people describe themselves as conventional, stable, well controlled, and dependable. They have little interest in problems requiring physical skills or intense relationships with others, and are most effective at well-defined tasks. They value material possessions and status. Vocational preferences are mostly within the business world, and include bank examiner, bank teller, bookkeeper, accountant, financial analyst, computer operator, inventory controller, tax expert, statistician, and traffic manager.
Personality types are a great conversation topic at parties but more importantly, personality types will be very helpful in learning what careers and majors you should consider. Please be sure to discuss your personality type with a career counselor before making any career decisions.

Accordin to Skillsand Interest

Conventional
1. Computational speed: able to manipulate numerical data rapidly and accurately
2. Program computers to solve quantitative or organizational problems
3. Audit or budget large amounts of monetary data with precision

The following skills will be needed to succeed in the future:

1.Computer literacy in all types of technology.
2. Flexibility and adaptability to handle changing roles and management styles.
3. Diversity in ability to function and work with people from a broad range of ages, cultures, and learning styles.
4. Language skills-especially knowledge of multiple languages for global marketplace.
5. Team players. Networking and negotiating skills a must.
6. Learning skills and continuous reeducation. We all must be lifelong learners.
7. Personal career planning skills (self-assessment, inner worth, current skills).
8. Global awareness/orientation. Knowledge of a country and region as well as the culture of the people.
9. Oral and written communications skills become even more valuable as corporations flatten. People must be self-starters.
10. Strong ethical framework.
11. Environmental scanning skills; knowing where your company is going and where the opportunities will be.

How do you keep up the latest way especially in IT Career?
Ans. Some ways that I'm going to keep up in IT career are as follow:
1. Applying related skills in order to accomplish the specific goal.
2. Sharing appropriate knowledge.
3. Applying decision making.
4. Give your best interest.

dadivas lice said...

http://dadivaslice.blogspot.com/

uez said...

http://xesuez.blogspot.com/

junei said...

June Irine Aloro BSIT IV-B

HELLO ms.this is my blog URL
in current future trends in IT

http://junei-current.blogspot.com/

dadivas lice said...

http://dadivaslice.blogspot.com/

Good day ma'am
this is my research assignment,just
visit this URL,thank you..

junei said...

Innovative ways to keep updated in current IT trends
by:
Aloro, June Irine
Baranggan, Realyn
1.attending conferences
-attending conferences is a great way to keep up and stay informed about developments in the field.

2.reading blogs
-Librarians, libraries, and related organizations are writing about developments, ideas, and relevant events on their blogs

3.joining lists.
-Email lists are also great tools to connect with like-minded information professionals and learn from their discussions.

source:
http://www.lisjobs.com/career_trends/?p=22

junei said...

HOW DO YOU KEEP UP WITH THE LATEST TREND IN IT?

-I keep myself updated with the latest trend in IT by reading a lot of learning tools/materials such as surfing in the net, reading some magazines or newspaper.and listening news from my friends about "whats new in gadget or in technology" and even watching televisions that caters about technology ..

Elizabeth P. Garido said...

Member:
Evangeline Garrido
Elizabeth Garido

http://egarids.blogspot.com

grace said...

Ma'am gud afternoon
amo ni sya ang blog ko sa Current TRends In IT.......
http://grace-currenttrends.blogspot.com

MCIT 412 WEB PUBLISHING said...

http://nairvill.blogspot.com/

Rian Villaceran BSIT IV-B

This is my blog URL for CURRENT FUTURE TREND FOR IT.

sheng said...

hi maam good afternoon
http://sheena-currenttrends.blogspot.com/
sheena hartinela

Joebeth D. Buenavista said...

http://kenjoebuenavista.blogspot.com/

JOEBETH BUENAVISTA BSIT IV-B

sheng said...

the movie Simone is very fascinating,and i enjoy it very much.sheena

Joebeth D. Buenavista said...

http://kenjoebuenavista.blogspot.com/

Ma'am This is my Blog URL for CURRENT FUTURE TREND IN IT!!!!

JOEBETH BUENAVISTA BSIT IV-B

RhEa SiaRoT PagLiNaWaN said...

hi ma'am, this is my Blog URL...

-Paglinawan, Rhea S.
BSIT IV-B

Rezel said...

http://rezelmedalla.blogspot.com/

hi ma'am' this is my url blogs!

Zeus said...

Conventional ways to keep updated in current IT trends

By: Zeus Fernandez
Welvie Tupas

Information professionals, just like their users, struggle with information overload and keeping up with whirlwind developments in the information world. While it is difficult enough to keep up as a working information professional, this is especially challenging for librarians not currently in the workplace. How do you keep up and stay current when you are on maternity/parental leave, while on sabbatical, or even when you are a librarian without a library?

Although this article addresses issues specific to those on maternity leave, the current awareness resources and techniques discussed apply to anyone out of the library workforce or on any type of leave.
First, utilize conventional ways of keeping up: attending conferences, reading blogs, and joining lists.

Attending conferences is a great way to keep up and stay informed about developments in the field. If at all possible, try to physically attend your local library conference. If this is not a possibility, consider reading conference blogs (by bloggers attending conferences). Many associations (such as the American Library Association and the Canadian Library Association), as well as individual speakers, make conference presentation slides and handouts available on their websites.

Librarians, libraries, and related organizations are writing about developments, ideas, and relevant events on their blogs. Technorati currently tracks 112.8 million blogs: How many should you monitor? One rule of thumb is to monitor (via RSS feeds) at least three different types of blogs: one technology-related, one general library blog, and one blog specific to your library type, subject area, or position. You can use Technorati to search for blogs as well as to determine their ranking within the blogosphere.

Email lists are also great tools to connect with like-minded information professionals and learn from their discussions. Use similar guidelines to determine the types of lists you should monitor; most will give you the option to receive messages in digest form instead of as individual email messages. If your organization has an internal list, consider remaining subscribed while on leave to keep abreast of internal discussions and developments.

Zeus said...

How do you keep up with the latest trends particularly in IT career?

By: Zeus Fernandez
You must investigate leads as to where the jobs will be in this rapidly changing environment. Finding a mentor within the business will help, however you must do the research, you must be the investigator:

evaluate the business;
seek out future options;
investigate company facilities for career management;
select a mentor;
identify promotional opportunities;
examine work practices and values.
Match your career aspirations to your knowledge of the future human resource needs of the organisation. Some senior financial executives are already opting for a portfolio career or working towards it. This can be a combination of consulting, teaching and directorships or solely directorships. This is a fast-growing new trend, particularly for women.

Many professionals are aware of the need to market products and services yet have a complete resistance to the concept of self-marketing. Leaders in the 2000s will not only have high-level technical and interpersonal skills, they will ensure that the package is right. This also involves a portfolio of marketing tools such as a CV that is concise, targeted and represents a true track record of achievement.

the matchless group said...

Types of interviews....

by: Realyn Baranggan BSIT IV-B

http://currentfuturetrends.blogspot.com/

the matchless group said...

HOW DO YO KEEP UP WITH THE LATEST TRENDS IN IT?

I keep up with the latest trend in IT by surfing the net, watching televisions,& visiting various blogs.
I also join social network sites.

by: Realyn Baranggan BSIT IV-B

joyce ann ello said...

Interview Techniques

The purpose of the interview is to provide the researcher with a relatively flexible format for the gathering of data; it is a technique widely used in the clinical and health sciences. Interviews are usually thought of as structured or unstructured though the terms like guided and open-ended are also used. It is important that the purpose of the interview is two-fold: (1.) The employers need to find out if you are the best candidate for the job and (2.) You need to find out if this is a good opportunity for you.

Types of Job Interview:
The structured interview, at its most formal may be considered as an oral presentation of a written questionnaire. The interviewer will read out the questions and the person being interviewed will give their response; other interaction is kept to a minimum. Structured interviews will usually have a fixed number of questions and even the possible responses may be restricted. This implies that the questions used in structured interviews will tend to be closed questions although this is not always the case. Those who favour the structured interview will argue that this method is more efficient in terms of the time taken to collect the data and the degree of reliability and validity will be greater than in the more unstructured interview formats. The main disadvantages with a structured approach is that the data gathered will lack the richness obtained by more open-ended interviews, and because the number of possible responses is often limited, participants may be forced into giving responses which do not reflect their true feelings about an issue.

Unstructured interviews tend not to use prepared questionnaires or interview schedules, rather they will have a number of themes or issues which they aim to explore. The questions asked will be more likely to be open-ended, with the participant providing responses in their own words. The respondent may have more control over the conduct of the interview in that they are often allowed to discuss issues as they arise and not necessarily in an order predetermined by the interviewer. The result of this more open-ended approach is a richness of data which is unbiased by any interpretation which the interviewer may have placed on it. The main difficulties with unstructured interviews is that they are time consuming, and perhaps more importantly, the data collected from different respondents will obviously be different, and therefore not always comparable; this may raise issues of reliability and validity for data collected in this way.

(1.) Informational Interview. An informational interview is one of the most valuable sources of occupational information. While it may cover some of the same ground as printed material or on a company website, it presents opportunities for an intimate and flexible inside view of a job field unmatched by other sources. The informational interview communicates the first hand experiences and impressions of someone in the occupation, and is directed by your questions.

(2.) One-on-one Interview / Individual interview. The one-on-one format is the most familiar and common format in job interviewing. It's about two people sitting down to have a conversation. In this case, the conversation has a particular purpose: To determine whether there is a natural fit between the interviewer, the applicant and the job available. Both parties will leave this conversation with some kind of a judgment. The interviewer will know whether you can fulfill the responsibilities of the position, and you will know whether or not this is the right position, and company, for you to utilize and expand upon your talents. The interview is an opportunity for you to share your understanding of the job, the ideas and values you bring to the position, your motivations for applying, your talents and weaknesses, and other aspects of your candidacy.

(3.) Group Interview. The group interview helps the company get a glimpse of how candidates interact with peers-if they are timid or bossy, attentive or seek attention. Interviewing simultaneously with other candidates can be disconcerting, but it provides the company with a sense of candidate leadership potential and style. he interviewer might call on a candidate to discuss an issue with the other candidates, solve a problem collectively, or discuss peculiar qualifications in front of the other candidates.

(4.) Interactive Interview. The initial teacher training interview is your gateway onto a teacher training course – a chance to show your potential to be a good teacher. This virtual interview should help you prepare for an interview by illustrating the kinds of questions you'll be asked and the kinds of answers a training provider might be looking for. It does not form part of the real teacher training selection process and should take you no more than five minutes to complete. When it comes to your real interview, you'll be told exactly what to expect in advance – including how many people you’ll be seeing and whether you’ll need to take part in any group exercises or give a presentation.

(5.) Shadow Interview. Job shadowing is a work experience option where students learn about a job by walking through the work day as a shadow to a competent worker. The job shadowing work experience is a temporary, unpaid exposure to the workplace in an occupational area of interest to the student. Students witness firsthand the work environment, employability and occupational skills in practice, the value of professional training and potential career options. Job shadowing is designed to increase career awareness, help model student behavior through examples and reinforce in the student the link between classroom learning and work requirements. Almost any workplace is a potential job shadowing site.

(6.) Case Interview. Case interviews are broad, two-way discussions, rather than one-way tests and there is no perfect answer. You will be assessed more on how you go about dealing with the problem, rather than on the specific answers you come up with. As you work through the business case with your interviewer, you will also become better informed about our firm and the kinds of problems we solve. Most candidates enjoy the cases and the business issues they raise. Your approach to the case and the insights you reach will give you an opportunity to demonstrate your problem-solving abilities and help us get a sense of your potential.

(7.) Panel Interview. A panel interview involves three or more members of the hiring organization meeting simultaneously with the person being considered for the position. This interview style is most common in academia or when hiring a senior level corporate executive. The term “search committee” is commonly used to describe a Panel Interview.

(8.) Tag-Team Interview. This method of interviewing is often attractive for companies that rely heavily on team cooperation. Not only does the company want to know whether your skills balance that of the company, but also whether you can get along with the other workers. In some companies, multiple people will interview you simultaneously. In other companies, you will proceed through a series of one-on-one interviews.

(9.) Alternative Interview Types
Lunch or Meal Interview. For many, interviewing over a meal sounds like a professional and digestive catastrophe in the making. If you have difficulty chewing gum while walking, this could be a challenge. With some preparation and psychological readjustment, you can enjoy the process. Meals often have a cementing social effect-breaking bread together tends to facilitate deals, marriages, friendships, and religious communion. Mealtime interviews rely on this logic, and expand it.
Stress Interview. Astounding as this is, the Greek hazing system has made its way into professional interviews. Either employers view the stress interview as a legitimate way of determining candidates' aptness for a position or someone has latent maniacal tendencies. You might be held in the waiting room for an hour before the interviewer greets you. You might face long silences or cold stares. The interviewer might openly challenge your believes or judgment. You might be called upon to perform an impossible task on the fly-like convincing the interviewer to exchange shoes with you. Insults and miscommunication are common. All this is designed to see whether you have the mettle to withstand the company culture, the clients or other potential stress.

iron_59 said...

Different types of interview include:

Chronological
The interviewer will go through your experience chronologically and you will be expected to expand on items in your application.


Structured, Criteria Based
The interviewer will ask a series of questions based on the skills and qualities required for the job and expect you to give examples of when you have demonstrated these attributes. This method examines your past behavior as a predictor of future behavior. This type of interview is much more common now than chronological, especially with large graduate employers.

Technical
If your degree is directly relevant to the job, you are likely to be asked detailed questions about aspects of it. The interviewer will be trying to determine if you possess the technical know-how to do the job, that you can apply technical theory to practical problems, that you have a genuine interest in the technology and that you can back up any claims of technical skills that you have made in your application. So do refresh your memory about the subjects you studied during the earlier years of your degree, details of any projects undertaken and any outside courses which you have stated as relevant.
You may be asked to explain how you approached your final year project, the techniques you used, any problems you encountered and how you attempted to overcome them, the results you obtained, conclusions drawn and ideas for further development. You may also be asked to demonstrate your technical knowledge by attempting to solve problems posed by the interviewer, either real or hypothetical ones.

Case Study
Case study interviews are becoming increasingly common especially during interviews for management consulting firms. The aim of the case study interview is two-fold; firstly to see if the candidate is suited to the type of work the organization undertakes and, secondly to give the candidate an opportunity to see if they enjoy this type of work. They can take a number of different forms but most usually involve the analysis of a hypothetical business problem or answering a brainteaser (e.g. 'How many bottles of wine are consumed in the UK each week?').
No previous knowledge of the business is required and there is no 'right' way to answer the problem. The organization is looking for a demonstration of the candidate's problem solving abilities; the way they structure a problem, the ability to identify key issues, and to demonstrate logical thinking and creativity in their solutions. It is important to listen carefully to any information provided, think aloud to demonstrate the approach or framework you are using to solve the problem, and ask the interviewer questions to elicit further information if appropriate.
To prepare for this type of interview it is important to look at examples of case study questions and practice until you are more familiar with what is expected.


Felix Rusiana Jr. BSIT IV-B

elnamenoso said...

Types of Interviews

All job interviews have the same objective, but employers reach that objective in a variety of ways. You might enter the room expecting to tell stories about your professional successes and instead find yourself selling the interviewer a bridge or editing code at a computer. One strategy for performing your best during an interview is to know the rules of the particular game you are playing when you walk through the door.

Screening | Informational | Directive | Meandering
Stress | Behavioral | Audition | Group
Tag-Team | Mealtime | Follow-up

The Screening Interview

Companies use screening tools to ensure that candidates meet minimum qualification requirements. Computer programs are among the tools used to weed out unqualified candidates. (This is why you need a digital resume that is screening-friendly. See our resume center for help.) Sometimes human professionals are the gatekeepers. Screening interviewers often have honed skills to determine whether there is anything that might disqualify you for the position. Remember-they do not need to know whether you are the best fit for the position, only whether you are not a match. For this reason, screeners tend to dig for dirt. Screeners will hone in on gaps in your employment history or pieces of information that look inconsistent. They also will want to know from the outset whether you will be too expensive for the company.

Some tips for maintaining confidence during screening interviews:

* Highlight your accomplishments and qualifications.
* Get into the straightforward groove. Personality is not as important to the screener as verifying your qualifications. Answer questions directly and succinctly. Save your winning personality for the person making hiring decisions!
* Be tactful about addressing income requirements. Give a range, and try to avoid giving specifics by replying, "I would be willing to consider your best offer."
* If the interview is conducted by phone, it is helpful to have note cards with your vital information sitting next to the phone. That way, whether the interviewer catches you sleeping or vacuuming the floor, you will be able to switch gears quickly.

The Informational Interview

On the opposite end of the stress spectrum from screening interviews is the informational interview. A meeting that you initiate, the informational interview is underutilized by job-seekers who might otherwise consider themselves savvy to the merits of networking. Job seekers ostensibly secure informational meetings in order to seek the advice of someone in their current or desired field as well as to gain further references to people who can lend insight. Employers that like to stay apprised of available talent even when they do not have current job openings, are often open to informational interviews, especially if they like to share their knowledge, feel flattered by your interest, or esteem the mutual friend that connected you to them. During an informational interview, the jobseeker and employer exchange information and get to know one another better without reference to a specific job opening.

This takes off some of the performance pressure, but be intentional nonetheless:

* Come prepared with thoughtful questions about the field and the company.
* Gain references to other people and make sure that the interviewer would be comfortable if you contact other people and use his or her name.
* Give the interviewer your card, contact information and resume.
* Write a thank you note to the interviewer.

The Directive Style

In this style of interview, the interviewer has a clear agenda that he or she follows unflinchingly. Sometimes companies use this rigid format to ensure parity between interviews; when interviewers ask each candidate the same series of questions, they can more readily compare the results. Directive interviewers rely upon their own questions and methods to tease from you what they wish to know. You might feel like you are being steam-rolled, or you might find the conversation develops naturally. Their style does not necessarily mean that they have dominance issues, although you should keep an eye open for these if the interviewer would be your supervisor.

Either way, remember:

* Flex with the interviewer, following his or her lead.
* Do not relinquish complete control of the interview. If the interviewer does not ask you for information that you think is important to proving your superiority as a candidate, politely interject it.

The Meandering Style

This interview type, usually used by inexperienced interviewers, relies on you to lead the discussion. It might begin with a statement like "tell me about yourself," which you can use to your advantage. The interviewer might ask you another broad, open-ended question before falling into silence. This interview style allows you tactfully to guide the discussion in a way that best serves you.

The following strategies, which are helpful for any interview, are particularly important when interviewers use a non-directive approach:

* Come to the interview prepared with highlights and anecdotes of your skills, qualities and experiences. Do not rely on the interviewer to spark your memory-jot down some notes that you can reference throughout the interview.
* Remain alert to the interviewer. Even if you feel like you can take the driver's seat and go in any direction you wish, remain respectful of the interviewer's role. If he or she becomes more directive during the interview, adjust.
* Ask well-placed questions. Although the open format allows you significantly to shape the interview, running with your own agenda and dominating the conversation means that you run the risk of missing important information about the company and its needs.

The Stress Interview

Astounding as this is, the Greek hazing system has made its way into professional interviews. Either employers view the stress interview as a legitimate way of determining candidates' aptness for a position or someone has latent maniacal tendencies. You might be held in the waiting room for an hour before the interviewer greets you. You might face long silences or cold stares. The interviewer might openly challenge your believes or judgment. You might be called upon to perform an impossible task on the fly-like convincing the interviewer to exchange shoes with you. Insults and miscommunication are common. All this is designed to see whether you have the mettle to withstand the company culture, the clients or other potential stress.

Besides wearing a strong anti-perspirant, you will do well to:

* Remember that this is a game. It is not personal. View it as the surreal interaction that it is.
* Prepare and memorize your main message before walking through the door. If you are flustered, you will better maintain clarity of mind if you do not have to wing your responses.
* Even if the interviewer is rude, remain calm and tactful.
* Go into the interview relaxed and rested. If you go into it feeling stressed, you will have a more difficult time keeping a cool perspective.

The Behavioral Interview

Many companies increasingly rely on behavior interviews since they use your previous behavior to indicate your future performance. In these interviews, employers use standardized methods to mine information relevant to your competency in a particular area or position. Depending upon the responsibilities of the job and the working environment, you might be asked to describe a time that required problem-solving skills, adaptability, leadership, conflict resolution, multi-tasking, initiative or stress management. You will be asked how you dealt with the situations.

Your responses require not only reflection, but also organization. To maximize your responses in the behavioral format:

* Anticipate the transferable skills and personal qualities that are required for the job.
* Review your resume. Any of the qualities and skills you have included in your resume are fair game for an interviewer to press.
* Reflect on your own professional, volunteer, educational and personal experience to develop brief stories that highlight these skills and qualities in you. You should have a story for each of the competencies on your resume as well as those you anticipate the job requires.
* Prepare stories by identifying the context, logically highlighting your actions in the situation, and identifying the results of your actions. Keep your responses concise and present them in less than two minutes.

The Audition

For some positions, such as computer programmers or trainers, companies want to see you in action before they make their decision. For this reason, they might take you through a simulation or brief exercise in order to evaluate your skills. An audition can be enormously useful to you as well, since it allows you to demonstrate your abilities in interactive ways that are likely familiar to you. The simulations and exercises should also give you a simplified sense of what the job would be like. If you sense that other candidates have an edge on you in terms of experience or other qualifications, requesting an audition can help level the playing field.

To maximize on auditions, remember to:

* Clearly understand the instructions and expectations for the exercise. Communication is half the battle in real life, and you should demonstrate to the prospective employer that you make the effort to do things right the first time by minimizing confusion.
* Treat the situation as if you are a professional with responsibility for the task laid before you. Take ownership of your work.
* Brush up on your skills before an interview if you think they might be tested.

The Group Interview

Interviewing simultaneously with other candidates can be disconcerting, but it provides the company with a sense of your leadership potential and style. The group interview helps the company get a glimpse of how you interact with peers-are you timid or bossy, are you attentive or do you seek attention, do others turn to you instinctively, or do you compete for authority? The interviewer also wants to view what your tools of persuasion are: do you use argumentation and careful reasoning to gain support or do you divide and conquer? The interviewer might call on you to discuss an issue with the other candidates, solve a problem collectively, or discuss your peculiar qualifications in front of the other candidates.

This environment might seem overwhelming or hard to control, but there are a few tips that will help you navigate the group interview successfully:

* Observe to determine the dynamics the interviewer establishes and try to discern the rules of the game. If you are unsure of what is expected from you, ask for clarification from the interviewer.
* Treat others with respect while exerting influence over others.
* Avoid overt power conflicts, which will make you look uncooperative and immature.
* Keep an eye on the interviewer throughout the process so that you do not miss important cues.

The Tag-Team Interview

Expecting to meet with Ms. Glenn, you might find yourself in a room with four other people: Ms. Glenn, two of her staff, and the Sales Director. Companies often want to gain the insights of various people when interviewing candidates. This method of interviewing is often attractive for companies that rely heavily on team cooperation. Not only does the company want to know whether your skills balance that of the company, but also whether you can get along with the other workers. In some companies, multiple people will interview you simultaneously. In other companies, you will proceed through a series of one-on-one interviews.

Some helpful tips for maximizing on this interview format:

* Treat each person as an important individual. Gain each person's business card at the beginning of the meeting, if possible, and refer to each person by name. If there are several people in the room at once, you might wish to scribble down their names on a sheet of paper according to where each is sitting. Make eye contact with each person and speak directly to the person asking each question.
* Use the opportunity to gain as much information about the company as you can. Just as each interviewer has a different function in the company, they each have a unique perspective. When asking questions, be sensitive not to place anyone in a position that invites him to compromise confidentiality or loyalty.
* Bring at least double the anecdotes and sound-bites to the interview as you would for a traditional one-on-one interview. Be ready to illustrate your main message in a variety of ways to a variety of people.
* Prepare psychologically to expend more energy and be more alert than you would in a one-on-one interview. Stay focused and adjustable.

The Mealtime Interview

For many, interviewing over a meal sounds like a professional and digestive catastrophe in the making. If you have difficulty chewing gum while walking, this could be a challenge. With some preparation and psychological readjustment, you can enjoy the process. Meals often have a cementing social effect-breaking bread together tends to facilitate deals, marriages, friendships, and religious communion. Mealtime interviews rely on this logic, and expand it.

Particularly when your job requires interpersonal acuity, companies want to know what you are like in a social setting. Are you relaxed and charming or awkward and evasive? Companies want to observe not only how you handle a fork, but also how you treat your host, any other guests, and the serving staff.

Some basic social tips help ease the complexity of mixing food with business:

* Take cues from your interviewer, remembering that you are the guest. Do not sit down until your host does. Order something slightly less extravagant than your interviewer. If he badly wants you to try a particular dish, oblige him. If he recommends an appetizer to you, he likely intends to order one himself. Do not begin eating until he does. If he orders coffee and dessert, do not leave him eating alone.
* If your interviewer wants to talk business, do so. If she and the other guests discuss their upcoming travel plans or their families, do not launch into business.
* Try to set aside dietary restrictions and preferences. Remember, the interviewer is your host. It is rude to be finicky unless you absolutely must. If you must, be as tactful as you can. Avoid phrases like: "I do not eat mammals," or "Shrimp makes my eyes swell and water."
* Choose manageable food items, if possible. Avoid barbeque ribs and spaghetti.
* Find a discrete way to check your teeth after eating. Excuse yourself from the table for a moment.
* Practice eating and discussing something important simultaneously.
* Thank your interviewer for the meal.

The Follow-up Interview

Companies bring candidates back for second and sometimes third or fourth interviews for a number of reasons. Sometimes they just want to confirm that you are the amazing worker they first thought you to be. Sometimes they are having difficulty deciding between a short-list of candidates. Other times, the interviewer's supervisor or other decision makers in the company want to gain a sense of you before signing a hiring decision.

The second interview could go in a variety of directions, and you must prepare for each of them. When meeting with the same person again, you do not need to be as assertive in your communication of your skills. You can focus on cementing rapport, understanding where the company is going and how your skills mesh with the company vision and culture. Still, the interviewer should view you as the answer to their needs. You might find yourself negotiating a compensation package. Alternatively, you might find that you are starting from the beginning with a new person.

Some tips for managing second interviews:

* Be confident. Accentuate what you have to offer and your interest in the position.
* Probe tactfully to discover more information about the internal company dynamics and culture.
* Walk through the front door with a plan for negotiating a salary.
* Be prepared for anything: to relax with an employer or to address the company's qualms about you.

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luvrock said...

Types of Interviews:

All job interviews have the same objective, but employers reach that objective in a variety of ways. You might enter the room expecting to tell stories about your professional successes and instead find yourself selling the interviewer a bridge or editing code at a computer. One strategy for performing your best during an interview is to know the rules of the particular game you are playing when you walk through the door.

The Screening Interview

Companies use screening tools to ensure that candidates meet minimum qualification requirements. Computer programs are among the tools used to weed out unqualified candidates. (This is why you need a digital resume that is screening-friendly. See our resume center for help.) Sometimes human professionals are the gatekeepers. Screening interviewers often have honed skills to determine whether there is anything that might disqualify you for the position. Remember-they do not need to know whether you are the best fit for the position, only whether you are not a match. For this reason, screeners tend to dig for dirt. Screeners will hone in on gaps in your employment history or pieces of information that look inconsistent. They also will want to know from the outset whether you will be too expensive for the company.

Some tips for maintaining confidence during screening interviews:

* Highlight your accomplishments and qualifications.
* Get into the straightforward groove. Personality is not as important to the screener as verifying your qualifications. Answer questions directly and succinctly. Save your winning personality for the person making hiring decisions!
* Be tactful about addressing income requirements. Give a range, and try to avoid giving specifics by replying, "I would be willing to consider your best offer."
* If the interview is conducted by phone, it is helpful to have note cards with your vital information sitting next to the phone. That way, whether the interviewer catches you sleeping or vacuuming the floor, you will be able to switch gears quickly.

The Informational Interview

On the opposite end of the stress spectrum from screening interviews is the informational interview. A meeting that you initiate, the informational interview is underutilized by job-seekers who might otherwise consider themselves savvy to the merits of networking. Job seekers ostensibly secure informational meetings in order to seek the advice of someone in their current or desired field as well as to gain further references to people who can lend insight. Employers that like to stay apprised of available talent even when they do not have current job openings, are often open to informational interviews, especially if they like to share their knowledge, feel flattered by your interest, or esteem the mutual friend that connected you to them. During an informational interview, the jobseeker and employer exchange information and get to know one another better without reference to a specific job opening.

This takes off some of the performance pressure, but be intentional nonetheless:

* Come prepared with thoughtful questions about the field and the company.
* Gain references to other people and make sure that the interviewer would be comfortable if you contact other people and use his or her name.
* Give the interviewer your card, contact information and resume.
* Write a thank you note to the interviewer.

The Directive Style

In this style of interview, the interviewer has a clear agenda that he or she follows unflinchingly. Sometimes companies use this rigid format to ensure parity between interviews; when interviewers ask each candidate the same series of questions, they can more readily compare the results. Directive interviewers rely upon their own questions and methods to tease from you what they wish to know. You might feel like you are being steam-rolled, or you might find the conversation develops naturally. Their style does not necessarily mean that they have dominance issues, although you should keep an eye open for these if the interviewer would be your supervisor.

Either way, remember:

* Flex with the interviewer, following his or her lead.
* Do not relinquish complete control of the interview. If the interviewer does not ask you for information that you think is important to proving your superiority as a candidate, politely interject it.

The Meandering Style

This interview type, usually used by inexperienced interviewers, relies on you to lead the discussion. It might begin with a statement like "tell me about yourself," which you can use to your advantage. The interviewer might ask you another broad, open-ended question before falling into silence. This interview style allows you tactfully to guide the discussion in a way that best serves you.

The following strategies, which are helpful for any interview, are particularly important when interviewers use a non-directive approach:

* Come to the interview prepared with highlights and anecdotes of your skills, qualities and experiences. Do not rely on the interviewer to spark your memory-jot down some notes that you can reference throughout the interview.
* Remain alert to the interviewer. Even if you feel like you can take the driver's seat and go in any direction you wish, remain respectful of the interviewer's role. If he or she becomes more directive during the interview, adjust.
* Ask well-placed questions. Although the open format allows you significantly to shape the interview, running with your own agenda and dominating the conversation means that you run the risk of missing important information about the company and its needs.

The Stress Interview

Astounding as this is, the Greek hazing system has made its way into professional interviews. Either employers view the stress interview as a legitimate way of determining candidates' aptness for a position or someone has latent maniacal tendencies. You might be held in the waiting room for an hour before the interviewer greets you. You might face long silences or cold stares. The interviewer might openly challenge your believes or judgment. You might be called upon to perform an impossible task on the fly-like convincing the interviewer to exchange shoes with you. Insults and miscommunication are common. All this is designed to see whether you have the mettle to withstand the company culture, the clients or other potential stress.

Besides wearing a strong anti-perspirant, you will do well to:

* Remember that this is a game. It is not personal. View it as the surreal interaction that it is.
* Prepare and memorize your main message before walking through the door. If you are flustered, you will better maintain clarity of mind if you do not have to wing your responses.
* Even if the interviewer is rude, remain calm and tactful.
* Go into the interview relaxed and rested. If you go into it feeling stressed, you will have a more difficult time keeping a cool perspective.

The Behavioral Interview

Many companies increasingly rely on behavior interviews since they use your previous behavior to indicate your future performance. In these interviews, employers use standardized methods to mine information relevant to your competency in a particular area or position. Depending upon the responsibilities of the job and the working environment, you might be asked to describe a time that required problem-solving skills, adaptability, leadership, conflict resolution, multi-tasking, initiative or stress management. You will be asked how you dealt with the situations.

Your responses require not only reflection, but also organization. To maximize your responses in the behavioral format:

* Anticipate the transferable skills and personal qualities that are required for the job.
* Review your resume. Any of the qualities and skills you have included in your resume are fair game for an interviewer to press.
* Reflect on your own professional, volunteer, educational and personal experience to develop brief stories that highlight these skills and qualities in you. You should have a story for each of the competencies on your resume as well as those you anticipate the job requires.
* Prepare stories by identifying the context, logically highlighting your actions in the situation, and identifying the results of your actions. Keep your responses concise and present them in less than two minutes.

The Audition

For some positions, such as computer programmers or trainers, companies want to see you in action before they make their decision. For this reason, they might take you through a simulation or brief exercise in order to evaluate your skills. An audition can be enormously useful to you as well, since it allows you to demonstrate your abilities in interactive ways that are likely familiar to you. The simulations and exercises should also give you a simplified sense of what the job would be like. If you sense that other candidates have an edge on you in terms of experience or other qualifications, requesting an audition can help level the playing field.

To maximize on auditions, remember to:

* Clearly understand the instructions and expectations for the exercise. Communication is half the battle in real life, and you should demonstrate to the prospective employer that you make the effort to do things right the first time by minimizing confusion.
* Treat the situation as if you are a professional with responsibility for the task laid before you. Take ownership of your work.
* Brush up on your skills before an interview if you think they might be tested.

The Group Interview

Interviewing simultaneously with other candidates can be disconcerting, but it provides the company with a sense of your leadership potential and style. The group interview helps the company get a glimpse of how you interact with peers-are you timid or bossy, are you attentive or do you seek attention, do others turn to you instinctively, or do you compete for authority? The interviewer also wants to view what your tools of persuasion are: do you use argumentation and careful reasoning to gain support or do you divide and conquer? The interviewer might call on you to discuss an issue with the other candidates, solve a problem collectively, or discuss your peculiar qualifications in front of the other candidates.

This environment might seem overwhelming or hard to control, but there are a few tips that will help you navigate the group interview successfully:

* Observe to determine the dynamics the interviewer establishes and try to discern the rules of the game. If you are unsure of what is expected from you, ask for clarification from the interviewer.
* Treat others with respect while exerting influence over others.
* Avoid overt power conflicts, which will make you look uncooperative and immature.
* Keep an eye on the interviewer throughout the process so that you do not miss important cues.

The Tag-Team Interview

Expecting to meet with Ms. Glenn, you might find yourself in a room with four other people: Ms. Glenn, two of her staff, and the Sales Director. Companies often want to gain the insights of various people when interviewing candidates. This method of interviewing is often attractive for companies that rely heavily on team cooperation. Not only does the company want to know whether your skills balance that of the company, but also whether you can get along with the other workers. In some companies, multiple people will interview you simultaneously. In other companies, you will proceed through a series of one-on-one interviews.

Some helpful tips for maximizing on this interview format:

* Treat each person as an important individual. Gain each person's business card at the beginning of the meeting, if possible, and refer to each person by name. If there are several people in the room at once, you might wish to scribble down their names on a sheet of paper according to where each is sitting. Make eye contact with each person and speak directly to the person asking each question.
* Use the opportunity to gain as much information about the company as you can. Just as each interviewer has a different function in the company, they each have a unique perspective. When asking questions, be sensitive not to place anyone in a position that invites him to compromise confidentiality or loyalty.
* Bring at least double the anecdotes and sound-bites to the interview as you would for a traditional one-on-one interview. Be ready to illustrate your main message in a variety of ways to a variety of people.
* Prepare psychologically to expend more energy and be more alert than you would in a one-on-one interview. Stay focused and adjustable.

The Mealtime Interview

For many, interviewing over a meal sounds like a professional and digestive catastrophe in the making. If you have difficulty chewing gum while walking, this could be a challenge. With some preparation and psychological readjustment, you can enjoy the process. Meals often have a cementing social effect-breaking bread together tends to facilitate deals, marriages, friendships, and religious communion. Mealtime interviews rely on this logic, and expand it.

Particularly when your job requires interpersonal acuity, companies want to know what you are like in a social setting. Are you relaxed and charming or awkward and evasive? Companies want to observe not only how you handle a fork, but also how you treat your host, any other guests, and the serving staff.

Some basic social tips help ease the complexity of mixing food with business:

* Take cues from your interviewer, remembering that you are the guest. Do not sit down until your host does. Order something slightly less extravagant than your interviewer. If he badly wants you to try a particular dish, oblige him. If he recommends an appetizer to you, he likely intends to order one himself. Do not begin eating until he does. If he orders coffee and dessert, do not leave him eating alone.
* If your interviewer wants to talk business, do so. If she and the other guests discuss their upcoming travel plans or their families, do not launch into business.
* Try to set aside dietary restrictions and preferences. Remember, the interviewer is your host. It is rude to be finicky unless you absolutely must. If you must, be as tactful as you can. Avoid phrases like: "I do not eat mammals," or "Shrimp makes my eyes swell and water."
* Choose manageable food items, if possible. Avoid barbeque ribs and spaghetti.
* Find a discrete way to check your teeth after eating. Excuse yourself from the table for a moment.
* Practice eating and discussing something important simultaneously.
* Thank your interviewer for the meal.

The Follow-up Interview

Companies bring candidates back for second and sometimes third or fourth interviews for a number of reasons. Sometimes they just want to confirm that you are the amazing worker they first thought you to be. Sometimes they are having difficulty deciding between a short-list of candidates. Other times, the interviewer's supervisor or other decision makers in the company want to gain a sense of you before signing a hiring decision.

The second interview could go in a variety of directions, and you must prepare for each of them. When meeting with the same person again, you do not need to be as assertive in your communication of your skills. You can focus on cementing rapport, understanding where the company is going and how your skills mesh with the company vision and culture. Still, the interviewer should view you as the answer to their needs. You might find yourself negotiating a compensation package. Alternatively, you might find that you are starting from the beginning with a new person.

Some tips for managing second interviews:

* Be confident. Accentuate what you have to offer and your interest in the position.
* Probe tactfully to discover more information about the internal company dynamics and culture.
* Walk through the front door with a plan for negotiating a salary.
* Be prepared for anything: to relax with an employer or to address the company's qualms about you.

elnamenoso said...

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iron_59 said...

http://frusiana.blogspot.com/

ma'am this is my research assignment in current future trends in IT

Felix Rusiana Jr.BSIT IV-B

j6_recs said...

http://j6recs.blogspot.com/






ma'am this is my URL....

JORY S. DE LA PEÑA

Emotera said...

http://mbausing.blogspot.com/
mary mae n. bausing

Emotera said...

Now a days keeping or staying current with the latest trends particularly in IT career is one the most rampant activity every does, whom the involved persons find ways to get trendy. By using different ways like blog search, which search engines and other places to find more sources, you should be keeping with when it comes to views about your chosen field. The more blogs you are able to read, the more insight you are likely to come along with and ultimately use to your gain. Another is the Online Communities or what we called forums. With this ,you can also stay current with what others are talking about and get a feed for current trends and concerns with regards to your profession...
God Speed Ms. Cutie

jhelane said...

jhelane bsit iv- b

The Behavioral Interview
Many companies increasingly rely on behavior interviews since they use your previous behavior to indicate your future performance. In these interviews, employers use standardized methods to mine information relevant to your competency in a particular area or position. Depending upon the responsibilities of the job and the working environment, you might be asked to describe a time that required problem-solving skills, adaptability, leadership, conflict resolution, multi-tasking, initiative or stress management. You will be asked how you dealt with the situations.
Your responses require not only reflection, but also organization. To maximize your responses in the behavioral format:
Anticipate the transferable skills and personal qualities that are required for the job.
Review your resume. Any of the qualities and skills you have included in your resume are fair game for an interviewer to press.
Reflect on your own professional, volunteer, educational and personal experience to develop brief stories that highlight these skills and qualities in you. You should have a story for each of the competencies on your resume as well as those you anticipate the job requires.
Prepare stories by identifying the context, logically highlighting your actions in the situation, and identifying the results of your actions. Keep your responses concise and present them in less than two minutes.

types of interview


Chronological
The interviewer will go through your experience chronologically and you will be expected to expand on items in your application.



Structured, Criteria Based
The interviewer will ask a series of questions based on the skills and qualities required for the job and expect you to give examples of when you have demonstrated these attributes. This method examines your past behaviour as a predictor of future behaviour. This type of interview is much more common now than chronological, especially with large graduate employers.

Technical
If your degree is directly relevant to the job, you are likely to be asked detailed questions about aspects of it. The interviewer will be trying to determine if you possess the technical know-how to do the job, that you can apply technical theory to practical problems, that you have a genuine interest in the technology and that you can back up any claims of technical skills that you have made in your application.


Case Study
Case study interviews are becoming increasingly common especially during interviews for management consulting firms. The aim of the case study interview is two-fold; firstly to see if the candidate is suited to the type of work the organisation undertakes and, secondly to give the candidate an opportunity to see if they enjoy this type of work.


A structured interview
(also known as a standardised interview or a researcher-administered survey) is a quantitative research method commonly employed in survey research.
Structured interviews are a means of collecting data for a statistical survey.
A structured interview also standardises the order in which questions are asked of survey respondents, so the questions are always answered within the same context.

Unstructured Interviews are a method of interviews where questions can be changed or adapted to meet the respondent's intelligence, understanding or belief. Unlike a structured interview they do not offer a limited, pre-set range of answers for a respondent to choose, but instead advocate listening to how each individual person responds to the question.


The Screening Interview
Companies use screening tools to ensure that candidates meet minimum qualification requirements. Computer programs are among the tools used to weed out unqualified candidates. (This is why you need a digital resume that is screening-friendly. See our resume center for help.
The Informational Interview
On the opposite end of the stress spectrum from screening interviews is the informational interview. A meeting that you initiate, the informational interview is underutilized by job-seekers who might otherwise consider themselves savvy to the merits of networking.
The Stress Interview
Astounding as this is, the Greek hazing system has made its way into professional interviews. Either employers view the stress interview as a legitimate way of determining candidates' aptness for a position or someone has latent maniacal tendencies.
The Group Interview
Interviewing simultaneously with other candidates can be disconcerting, but it provides the company with a sense of your leadership potential and style. The group interview helps the company get a glimpse of how you interact with peers-are you timid or bossy, are you attentive or do you seek attention, do others turn to you instinctively, or do you compete for authority
The Team Interview
This method of interviewing is often attractive for companies that rely heavily on team cooperation.

IT Current Trends said...

charlyn bsit iv-b


Types of Interviews
The Screening Interview
Companies use screening tools to ensure that candidates meet minimum qualification requirements. Computer programs are among the tools used to weed out unqualified candidates. (This is why you need a digital resume that is screening-friendly. See our resume center for help.) Sometimes human professionals are the gatekeepers. Screening interviewers often have honed skills to determine whether there is anything that might disqualify you for the position. Remember-they do not need to know whether you are the best fit for the position, only whether you are not a match. For this reason, screeners tend to dig for dirt. Screeners will hone in on gaps in your employment history or pieces of information that look inconsistent. They also will want to know from the outset whether you will be too expensive for the company.
Some tips for maintaining confidence during screening interviews:
Highlight your accomplishments and qualifications.
Get into the straightforward groove. Personality is not as important to the screener as verifying your qualifications. Answer questions directly and succinctly. Save your winning personality for the person making hiring decisions!
Be tactful about addressing income requirements. Give a range, and try to avoid giving specifics by replying, "I would be willing to consider your best offer."
If the interview is conducted by phone, it is helpful to have note cards with your vital information sitting next to the phone. That way, whether the interviewer catches you sleeping or vacuuming the floor, you will be able to switch gears quickly.
The Informational Interview
On the opposite end of the stress spectrum from screening interviews is the informational interview. A meeting that you initiate, the informational interview is underutilized by job-seekers who might otherwise consider themselves savvy to the merits of networking. Job seekers ostensibly secure informational meetings in order to seek the advice of someone in their current or desired field as well as to gain further references to people who can lend insight. Employers that like to stay apprised of available talent even when they do not have current job openings, are often open to informational interviews, especially if they like to share their knowledge, feel flattered by your interest, or esteem the mutual friend that connected you to them. During an informational interview, the jobseeker and employer exchange information and get to know one another better without reference to a specific job opening. This takes off some of the performance pressure, but be intentional nonetheless:
Come prepared with thoughtful questions about the field and the company.
Gain references to other people and make sure that the interviewer would be comfortable if you contact other people and use his or her name.
Give the interviewer your card, contact information and resume.
Write a thank you note to the interviewer.
The Stress Interview
Astounding as this is, the Greek hazing system has made its way into professional interviews. Either employers view the stress interview as a legitimate way of determining candidates' aptness for a position or someone has latent maniacal tendencies. You might be held in the waiting room for an hour before the interviewer greets you. You might face long silences or cold stares. The
interviewer might openly challenge your believes or judgment. You might be called upon to perform an impossible task on the fly-like convincing the interviewer to exchange shoes with you. Insults and miscommunication are common. All this is designed to see whether you have the mettle to withstand the company culture, the clients or other potential stress.
Besides wearing a strong anti-perspirant, you will do well to:
Remember that this is a game. It is not personal. View it as the surreal interaction that it is.
Prepare and memorize your main message before walking through the door. If you are flustered, you will better maintain clarity of mind if you do not have to wing your responses.
Even if the interviewer is rude, remain calm and tactful.
Go into the interview relaxed and rested. If you go into it feeling stressed, you will have a more difficult time keeping a cool perspectiv
The Group Interview
Interviewing simultaneously with other candidates can be disconcerting, but it provides the company with a sense of your leadership potential and style. The group interview helps the company get a glimpse of how you interact with peers-are you timid or bossy, are you attentive or do you seek attention, do others turn to you instinctively, or do you compete for authority? The interviewer also wants to view what your tools of persuasion are: do you use argumentation and careful reasoning to gain support or do you divide and conquer? The interviewer might call on you to discuss an issue with the other candidates, solve a problem collectively, or discuss your peculiar qualifications in front of the other candidates. This environment might seem overwhelming or hard to control, but there are a few tips that will help you navigate the group interview successfully:
Observe to determine the dynamics the interviewer establishes and try to discern the rules of the game. If you are unsure of what is expected from you, ask for clarification from the interviewer.
Treat others with respect while exerting influence over others.
Avoid overt power conflicts, which will make you look uncooperative and immature.
Keep an eye on the interviewer throughout the process so that you do not miss important cues.
One-to-one InterviewThis is the most common type of Interview. In the One-to-one interview the candidate for employment meets directly with the interviewer.
Phone interviewPhone Interviews are becoming increasingly popular among large corporations who are conducting a mass-hiring of employees. These interviews are conducted entirely over the phone and eliminate bias that may arise from a candidate’s appearance, mannerisms, or ethnicity. Often times, phone interview questions are structured and the question are behavioral in nature; to further eliminate bias.
When preparing for a phone interview you should follow all of the steps listed above including getting dressed for the interview. Studies have shown that people who dress professionally for a phone interview will perform better than those dressed casually.
What is an individual interview?
Individual interviews typically refer to talking with one user at a time (for 30 minutes to an hour) face to face, by telephone, or with instant messaging or other computer-aided means. These interviews do not involve watching a user work. Thus, this is different from interviewing users in a usability testing session or conducting contextual interviews.
What can you learn from an interview?
Individual interviews can give you a deep understanding of the people who come to your site. You can probe their attitudes, beliefs, desires, and experiences. You can also ask them to rate or rank choices for the Web site content.
INTERVIEW FORMAT
The opening l
The body l
The closing
THE OPENING The opening clearly identifies you, your subject and the topic. This allows your audience to know “up front” whether the interview has any direct interest to them. Additionally, the opening can give your location to establish a local tie-in or explain any background noises.
THE BODY The body is the interview itself — the actual questions and answers. At this point, the interview takes shape and becomes a reality.
THE CLOSING The closing is an abbreviated form of the opening. During the closing, you can summarize briefly the content of the interview and once again identify yourself and your guest.
A case interview is a job interview in which the applicant is given a question/situation/problem/challenge and asked to resolve the situation. The case problem is often a business situation or a business case that the interviewer has worked on in real life.
After the applicant is given information about the case, the applicant is expected to ask the interviewer logical and sequential questions that will enable the applicant to understand the situation, probe deeper into relevant areas, gather pertinent information and arrive at a solution or recommendation for the question or situation at hand.
Case interviews are mostly used in hiring for management consulting and investment banking jobs. Firms use case interviews to evaluate analytical ability and problem-solving skills; they are looking not for a "correct" answer" but for an understanding of how the applicant thinks and how the applicant approaches problems.[1]
During case interviews, interviewers are generally looking for the following skills.[2]:
Numerical and verbal reasoning skills
Communication and presentation skills
Business skills and commercial awareness
Candidates are often asked to estimate a specific number, often a commercial figure (such as market size or profitability). Candidates are expected to demonstrate reasoning rather produce the exact answer [3].
A case interview can also be conducted as a group exercise. Here several candidates are given some briefing materials on a business problem and asked to discuss and agree upon a solution. The interviewers normally sit around the exterior of the room as silent observers. They assess candidates communication and interaction as well as analytical thinking and commercial awareness.
Telephone Interviews: The telephone interview is the most common way to perform an initial screening interview. This helps the interviewer and the candidate get a general sense if they are mutually interested in pursuing a discussion beyond the first interview. This type of interviewing also saves time and money. They may be tape recorded for the review of other interviewers.
Computer Interviews:The computer interview involves answering a series of multiple-choice questions for a potential job interview or simply for the submission of a resume. Some of these interviews are done through the telephone or by accessing a web site. One type is done with pushing the appropriate buttons on the telephone for the answer you are submitting. Wal-Mart uses this method for screening cashiers, stockers, and customer service representatives.
Another type of computer interview is provided by accessing a website while using a computer keyboard and a mouse. Some of the questions on both of these types of interviews are related to ethics. As an example, "If you see a fellow co-worker take a candy bar and eat it, do you a. Confront co-worker, b. Tell the supervisor, c. Do nothing."

LEONA C. CANILLO said...

LEONA C. CANILLO BSIT IV-B

Email Add: jleons065@gmail.com
BLOG URL
http://leehanz-leona-currenttrends.blogspot.com/

TYPES OF INTERVIEW

susan escatin said...

susan escatin

Informational Interview:

Skillfully used, an informational interview is one of the most valuable sources of occupational information. While it may cover some of the same ground as printed material or on a company website, it presents opportunities for an intimate and flexible inside view of a job field unmatched by other sources.
The informational interview: communicates the first hand experiences and impressions of someone in the occupation, and is directed by your questions.
An informational interview is less stressful for both you and the employer than a typical job interview. You are the one in control. Questions can be asked that may not be strategic during a first interview (i.e., questions regarding salary, benefits, vacation). You can discuss what is done on a day-to-day basis and relate it to your own interests and feelings.

One to One Job Interview



The most common interview is the one to one. The interviewer with the interviewee. The One to One Job Interview is a test/conversation and both parties will end the conversation with an opinion. The interviewer: if the candidate is right for the job and the interviewee: if the organization is right for him.

The interviewer is going to conduct an 'investigation' in order to see if you are fit for the job vacancy and whether you are better at the job than the other candidates. The interviewer will ask questions of a technical nature and of a general nature.

General questions will analyze your problem solving abilities and your ability to socialize with the rest of the team. Always use previous achievements to back any facts you mention. Even if such achievements were at the school newspaper, employers under stand that school leavers have to start from some where.

This virtual interview should help you prepare for an interview by illustrating the kinds of questions you'll be asked and the kinds of answers a training provider might be looking for. It does not form part of the real teacher training selection process and should take you no more than five minutes to complete.

interactive interview


When it comes to your real interview, you'll be told exactly what to expect in advance – including how many people you'll be seeing and whether you'll need to take part in any group exercises or give a presentation.

CASE INTERVIEW

Case interviews are broad, two-way discussions, rather than one-way tests and there is no perfect answer. You will be assessed more on how you go about dealing with the problem, rather than on the specific answers you come up with.

As you work through the business case with your interviewer, you will also become better informed about our firm and the kinds of problems we solve. Most candidates enjoy the cases and the business issues they raise. Your approach to the case and the insights you reach will give you an opportunity to demonstrate your problem-solving abilities and help us get a sense of your potential.

Video Job Interviews
More and more employers are using web based job video interviews to screen candidates for employment. In some cases, hiring managers will conduct screening interviews via video. In other cases, most of the interview process takes place using video.There is consistency - all candidates are asked the same set of questions. Questions can be specifically tailored for the job the employer is hiring for. Hiring managers have the opportunity to replay, review, and rate the interviews online, so they can compare candiates without having to remember who said what or review their notes.

After hiring managers review the video interviews, they can select certain candidates for managers to review. Again, the manager can see each candidate answering the same questions, and can compare the responses. For the employer, video interviewing can save time and hiring expenses, because there are reduced travel costs and management time.

Multimedia Interview

Multimedia Interview Questions, Learn by sharing Multimedia Interview Questions asked in various Companies, Get Career advices, Interview Procedures from Multimedia experts, Post asked Multimedia Interview Questions and Answers.

RACHEL said...

hi mam..
This is my URL blog in Current ...http://jabaybay.blogspot.com..ara da tanan nkabutang akon mga types of interview..


Types of Interviews

All job interviews have the same objective, but employers reach that objective in a variety of ways. You might enter the room expecting to tell stories about your professional successes and instead find yourself selling the interviewer a bridge or editing code at a computer. One strategy for performing your best during an interview is to know the rules of the particular game you are playing when you walk through the door.

Screening | Informational | Directive | Meandering
Stress | Behavioral | Audition | Group
Tag-Team | Mealtime | Follow-up

The Screening Interview

Companies use screening tools to ensure that candidates meet minimum qualification requirements. Computer programs are among the tools used to weed out unqualified candidates. (This is why you need a digital resume that is screening-friendly. See our resume center for help.) Sometimes human professionals are the gatekeepers. Screening interviewers often have honed skills to determine whether there is anything that might disqualify you for the position. Remember-they do not need to know whether you are the best fit for the position, only whether you are not a match. For this reason, screeners tend to dig for dirt. Screeners will hone in on gaps in your employment history or pieces of information that look inconsistent. They also will want to know from the outset whether you will be too expensive for the company.

Some tips for maintaining confidence during screening interviews:
•Highlight your accomplishments and qualifications.
•Get into the straightforward groove. Personality is not as important to the screener as verifying your qualifications. Answer questions directly and succinctly. Save your winning personality for the person making hiring decisions!
•Be tactful about addressing income requirements. Give a range, and try to avoid giving specifics by replying, "I would be willing to consider your best offer."
•If the interview is conducted by phone, it is helpful to have note cards with your vital information sitting next to the phone. That way, whether the interviewer catches you sleeping or vacuuming the floor, you will be able to switch gears quickly.
The Informational Interview
On the opposite end of the stress spectrum from screening interviews is the informational interview. A meeting that you initiate, the informational interview is underutilized by job-seekers who might otherwise consider themselves savvy to the merits of networking. Job seekers ostensibly secure informational meetings in order to seek the advice of someone in their current or desired field as well as to gain further references to people who can lend insight. Employers that like to stay apprised of available talent even when they do not have current job openings, are often open to informational interviews, especially if they like to share their knowledge, feel flattered by your interest, or esteem the mutual friend that connected you to them. During an informational interview, the jobseeker and employer exchange information and get to know one another better without reference to a specific job opening.

This takes off some of the performance pressure, but be intentional nonetheless:
• Come prepared with thoughtful questions about the field and the company.
• Gain references to other people and make sure that the interviewer would be comfortable if you contact other people and use his or er name.
• Give the interviewer your card, contact information and resume.
•Write a thank you note to the interviewer.
The Directive Style
In this style of interview, the interviewer has a clear agenda that he or she follows unflinchingly. Sometimes companies use this rigid format to ensure parity between interviews; when interviewers ask each candidate the same series of questions, they can more readily compare the results. Directive interviewers rely upon their own questions and methods to tease from you what they wish to know. You might feel like you are being steam-rolled, or you might find the conversation develops naturally. Their style does not necessarily mean that they have dominance issues, although you should keep an eye open for these if the interviewer would be your supervisor.

Either way, remember:
•Flex with the interviewer, following his or her lead.
•Do not relinquish complete control of the interview. If the interviewer does not ask you for information that you think is important to proving your superiority as a candidate, politely interject it.
The Meandering Style
This interview type, usually used by inexperienced interviewers, relies on you to lead the discussion. It might begin with a statement like "tell me about yourself," which you can use to your advantage. The interviewer might ask you another broad, open-ended question before falling into silence. This interview style allows you tactfully to guide the discussion in a way that best serves you.

The following strategies, which are helpful for any interview, are particularly important when interviewers use a non-directive approach:

•Come to the interview prepared with highlights and anecdotes of your skills, qualities and experiences. Do not rely on the interviewer to spark your memory-jot down some notes that you can reference throughout the interview.

•Remain alert to the interviewer. Even if you feel like you can take the driver's seat and go in any direction you wish, remain respectful of the interviewer's role. If he or she becomes more directive during the interview, adjust.

•Ask well-placed questions. Although the open format allows you significantly to shape the interview, running with your own agenda and dominating the conversation means that you run the risk of missing important information about the company and its needs.
The Stress Interview
Astounding as this is, the Greek hazing system has made its way into professional interviews. Either employers view the stress interview as a legitimate way of determining candidates' aptness for a position or someone has latent maniacal tendencies. You might be held in the waiting room for an hour before the interviewer greets you. You might face long silences or cold stares. The interviewer might openly challenge your believes or judgment. You might be called upon to perform an impossible task on the fly-like convincing the interviewer to exchange shoes with you. Insults and miscommunication are common. All this is designed to see whether you have the mettle to withstand the company culture, the clients or other potential stress.
Besides wearing a strong anti-perspirant, you will do well to:
• Remember that this is a game. It is not personal. View it as the surreal interaction that it is.
•Prepare and memorize your main message before walking through the door. If you are flustered, you will better maintain clarity of mind if you do not have to wing your responses.
•Even if the interviewer is rude, remain calm and tactful.
• Go into the interview relaxed and rested. If you go into it feeling stressed, you will have a more difficult time keeping a cool perspective.
The Behavioral Interview
Many companies increasingly rely on behavior interviews since they use your previous behavior to indicate your future performance. In these interviews, employers use standardized methods to mine information relevant to your competency in a particular area or position. Depending upon the responsibilities of the job and the working environment, you might be asked to describe a time that required problem-solving skills, adaptability, leadership, conflict resolution, multi-tasking, initiative or stress management. You will be asked how you dealt with the situations.
Your responses require not only reflection, but also organization. To maximize your responses in the behavioral format:
• Anticipate the transferable skills and personal qualities that are required for the job.
• Review your resume. Any of the qualities and skills you have included in your resume are fair game for an interviewer to press.
• Reflect on your own professional, volunteer, educational and personal experience to develop brief stories that highlight these skills and qualities in you. You should have a story for each of the competencies on your resume as well as those you anticipate the job requires.
• Prepare stories by identifying the context, logically highlighting your actions in the situation, and identifying the results of your actions. Keep your responses concise and present them in less than two minutes.
The Audition
For some positions, such as computer programmers or trainers, companies want to see you in action before they make their decision. For this reason, they might take you through a simulation or brief exercise in order to evaluate your skills. An audition can be enormously useful to you as well, since it allows you to demonstrate your abilities in interactive ways that are likely familiar to you. The simulations and exercises should also give you a simplified sense of what the job would be like. If you sense that other candidates have an edge on you in terms of experience or other qualifications, requesting an audition can help level the playing field.
To maximize on auditions, remember to:
• Clearly understand the instructions and expectations for the exercise. Communication is half the battle in real life, and you should demonstrate to the prospective employer that you make the effort to do things right the first time by minimizing confusion.
• Treat the situation as if you are a professional with responsibility for the task laid before you. Take ownership of your work.
• Brush up on your skills before an interview if you think they might be tested.
The Group Interview
Interviewing simultaneously with other candidates can be disconcerting, but it provides the company with a sense of your leadership potential and style. The group interview helps the company get a glimpse of how you interact with peers-are you timid or bossy, are you attentive or do you seek attention, do others turn to you instinctively, or do you compete for authority? The interviewer also wants to view what your tools of persuasion are: do you use argumentation and careful reasoning to gain support or do you divide and conquer? The interviewer might call on you to discuss an issue with the other candidates, solve a problem collectively, or discuss your peculiar qualifications in front of the other candidates.

This environment might seem overwhelming or hard to control, but there are a few tips that will help you navigate the group interview successfully:
• Observe to determine the dynamics the interviewer establishes and try to discern the rules of the game. If you are unsure of what is expected from you, ask for clarification from the interviewer.
• Treat others with respect while exerting influence over others.
• Avoid overt power conflicts, which will make you look uncooperative and immature.
• Keep an eye on the interviewer throughout the process so that you do not miss important cues.
The Tag-Team Interview
Expecting to meet with Ms. Glenn, you might find yourself in a room with four other people: Ms. Glenn, two of her staff, and the Sales Director. Companies often want to gain the insights of various people when interviewing candidates. This method of interviewing is often attractive for companies that rely heavily on team cooperation. Not only does the company want to know whether your skills balance that of the company, but also whether you can get along with the other workers. In some companies, multiple people will interview you simultaneously. In other companies, you will proceed through a series of one-on-one interviews.

Some helpful tips for maximizing on this interview format:
• Treat each person as an important individual. Gain each person's business card at the beginning of the meeting, if possible, and refer to each person by name. If there are several people in the room at once, you might wish to scribble down their names on a sheet of paper according to where each is sitting. Make eye contact with each person and speak directly to the person asking each question.
• Use the opportunity to gain as much information about the company as you can. Just as each interviewer has a different function in the company, they each have a unique perspective. When asking questions, be sensitive not to place anyone in a position that invites him to compromise confidentiality or loyalty.
• Bring at least double the anecdotes and sound-bites to the interview as you would for a traditional one-on-one interview. Be ready to illustrate your main message in a variety of ways to a variety of people.
• Prepare psychologically to expend more energy and be more alert than you would in a one-on-one interview. Stay focused and adjustable.
The Mealtime Interview
For many, interviewing over a meal sounds like a professional and digestive catastrophe in the making. If you have difficulty chewing gum while walking, this could be a challenge. With some preparation and psychological readjustment, you can enjoy the process. Meals often have a cementing social effect-breaking bread together tends to facilitate deals, marriages, friendships, and religious communion. Mealtime interviews rely on this logic, and expand it.
Particularly when your job requires interpersonal acuity, companies want to know what you are like in a social setting. Are you relaxed and charming or awkward and evasive? Companies want to observe not only how you handle a fork, but also how you treat your host, any other guests, and the serving staff.
Some basic social tips help ease the complexity of mixing food with business:
• Take cues from your interviewer, remembering that you are the guest. Do not sit down until your host does. Order something slightly less extravagant than your interviewer. If he badly wants you to try a particular dish, oblige him. If he recommends an appetizer to you, he likely intends to order one himself. Do not begin eating until he does. If he orders coffee and dessert, do not leave him eating alone.
• If your interviewer wants to talk business, do so. If she and the other guests discuss their upcoming travel plans or their families, do not launch into business.
• Try to set aside dietary restrictions and preferences. Remember, the interviewer is your host. It is rude to be finicky unless you absolutely must. If you must, be as tactful as you can. Avoid phrases like: "I do not eat mammals," or "Shrimp makes my eyes swell and water."
• Choose manageable food items, if possible. Avoid barbeque ribs and spaghetti.
• Find a discrete way to check your teeth after eating. Excuse yourself from the table for a moment.
• Practice eating and discussing something important simultaneously.
• Thank your interviewer for the meal.
The Follow-up Interview
Companies bring candidates back for second and sometimes third or fourth interviews for a number of reasons. Sometimes they just want to confirm that you are the amazing worker they first thought you to be. Sometimes they are having difficulty deciding between a short-list of candidates. Other times, the interviewer's supervisor or other decision makers in the company want to gain a sense of you before signing a hiring decision.
The second interview could go in a variety of directions, and you must prepare for each of them. When meeting with the same person again, you do not need to be as assertive in your communication of your skills. You can focus on cementing rapport, understanding where the company is going and how your skills mesh with the company vision and culture. Still, the interviewer should view you as the answer to their needs. You might find yourself negotiating a compensation package. Alternatively, you might find that you are starting from the beginning with a new person.
Some tips for managing second interviews:
• Be confident. Accentuate what you have to offer and your interest in the position.
• Probe tactfully to discover more information about the internal company dynamics and culture.
• Walk through the front door with a plan for negotiating a salary.
• Be prepared for anything: to relax with an employer or to address the company's qualms about you.

linskie55@gmail.com said...

Types of Interviews

SCREENING INTERVIEW -- used to quickly and efficiently eliminate unqualified or overpriced candidates. Conducted by professional interviewers, recruiters, or personnel representatives seeking information regarding educational and experiential background using a highly structured question and answer format.
--is usually conducted by a member of the human resources department. The screening interview is designed to weed out unqualified candidates. Providing facts about your skills is more important than establishing rapport in this type of interview.

TELEPHONE SCREENING -- this interview saves the employer time by eliminating candidates based on essential criteria such as employment objective, education or required skills. Since these interviews will often occur unexpectedly, it is important that your job search records are organized and kept where you can reach them at a moment's notice.

COMMITTEE INTERVIEW -- committee interviews are a common practice. You will face several members of the company who have a say in whether you are hired. When answering questions from several people, speak directly to the person asking the question. It is not necessary to answer to the group. In some committee interviews, you may be asked to demonstrate your problem-solving skills. The committee will outline a situation and ask you to formulate a plan that deals with the problem. You don't have to come up with the ultimate solution. The interviewers are looking for how you apply your knowledge and skills to a real-life situation.

GROUP INTERVIEW -- a group interview is usually designed to uncover the leadership potential of prospective managers and employees who will be dealing with the public. The front-runner candidates are gathered together in an informal, discussion-type interview. A subject is introduced and the interviewer will start off the discussion. The goal of the group interview is to see how you interact with others and how you use your knowledge and reasoning powers to win others over. If you do well in the group interview, you can expect to be asked back for a more extensive interview.

LUNCH INTERVIEW -- a member of the personnel department usually conducts the screening interview, which is meant to weed out unqualified candidates. Providing facts about your skills is more important than establishing rapport. Interviewers will work from an outline of points they want to cover, looking for inconsistencies in your résumé and challenging your qualifications. Provide answers to their questions, and never volunteer any additional information. That information could work against you.

ONE ON ONE -- usual interview procedure. Screening and selection interviews usually include one interviewer and one candidate. At times, a second company representative may join in or candidate may have a series of interviews that involve several meetings with different people within the organization, one at a time.

ONE TO ONE (structured) -- probably the most widely used form of interviewing in graduate selection. In this type of interview, the interviewer will have a fixed set of questions that he/she will ask each candidate, with the aim of finding out the level of your skills in key areas pertinent to the role to which you have applied.

ONE TO ONE (unstructured) -- this type of interview is merely an informal chat where the interviewer will simply talk to you about a range of issues and subjects. It is more like a free flowing conversation and as such, not very effective in determining the suitability of a candidate. Consequently, it is rarely used in graduate selection.

VIDEO CONFERENCE INTERVIEW -- use the techniques you've learned from practicing before a video camera. Ensure privacy and treat it like any interview.

STRESS INTERVIEW -- staged to determine how candidate will perform under stress. It may be typified by long periods of silence, challenges to candidate's opinions, or a series of interruptions.

case interview -- is used primarily by management-consulting firms to determine how well suited you are to the consulting field. Case interviews measure problem-solving ability, tolerance for ambiguity, and communication skills along several dimensions. The idea is to find out how well you identify, structure, and think through problems.

Unstructured Interviews are a method of interviews where questions can be changed or adapted to meet the respondent's intelligence, understanding or belief. Unlike a structured interview they do not offer a limited, pre-set range of answers for a respondent to choose, but instead advocate listening to how each individual person responds to the question.

informational interview --Skillfully used, an informational interview is one of the most valuable sources of occupational information. While it may cover some of the same ground as printed material or on a company website, it presents opportunities for an intimate and flexible inside view of a job field unmatched by other sources. The informational interview communicates the first hand experiences and impressions of someone in the occupation, and is directed by your questions.

An informational interview is less stressful for both you and the employer than a typical job interview. You are the one in control. Questions can be asked that may not be strategic during a first interview (i.e., questions regarding salary, benefits, vacation). You can discuss what is done on a day-to-day basis and relate it to your own interests and feelings. Beyond the advantages of gaining valuable career information, the informational interview provides the opportunity to build self-confidence and to improve your ability to handle a job interview.

Informational interviews are initiated by the job seeker. There are many avenues the job seeker may pursue to obtain the informational interview. Career and social networking, newspaper want ads, job boards, placement services, company websites, human resource contacts, job search engines, and professional recruiters.

Shadow Interview -- Students will learn more about careers in which they are interested through a variety of activities, including a job shadow or a career related informational interview.

* Students are expected to show a clear relationship between their career pathway/career interest and the person that they will shadow or interview.
* Whether the student chooses to do an on-site visit or an interview, s/he will write a reflection paper following the activity. (questions follow)
* The amount of time to conduct a Job Shadow will vary according to the nature of the business; it will not be necessary to document the time on-site or the time to conduct an interview.
* A signature and date from the business representative are required.

Telephone interviews -- as a way of identifying and recruiting candidates for employment. Phone interviews are often used to screen candidates in order to narrow the pool of applicants who will be invited for in-person interviews. They are also used as way to minimize the expenses involved in interviewing out-of-town candidates.

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jenny sagal said...

Different Types of Interviews

One-to-one Interview
This is the most common type of Interview. In the One-to-one interview the candidate for employment meets directly with the interviewer.

Phone interview
Phone Interviews are becoming increasingly popular among large corporations who are conducting a mass-hiring of employees. These interviews are conducted entirely over the phone and eliminate bias that may arise from a candidate’s appearance, mannerisms, or ethnicity. Often times, phone interview questions are structured and the question are behavioral in nature; to further eliminate bias.

When preparing for a phone interview you should follow all of the steps listed above including getting dressed for the interview. Studies have shown that people who dress professionally for a phone interview will perform better than those dressed casually.

Group interview
In the group interview style you will be interviewing simultaneously with two or three other candidates all vying for the same position. In this interview style one or more applicants may be asked the same question or the pool of applicants can be broken into teams to determine a solution to a problem posed by the interviewer. This style of interviewing is most common in the technology fields or any field where group cohesiveness is of extreme importance.

The best way to prepare for a group interview is to follow the steps listed above.

Panel Interview
A panel interview involves three or more members of the hiring organization meeting simultaneously with the person being considered for the position. This interview style is most common in academia or when hiring a senior level corporate executive. The term “search committee” is commonly used to describe a Panel Interview.

In preparing for a panel interview it is best to understand an organization from every point of view. For example, if you are going to be interviewed by an organization’s Customer Service Manager, Finance Manager, and Human Resources Manager; you should familiarize yourself with current information about the organizations customer service policies, finance policies, and HR policies.

Mock Interview

The Mock Interview allows prospective job candidates to practice their interviewing skills in a simulated interview environment. Mock interviews provide constructive feedback to the participants to enhance job prospects by improving interview skills.

Career fair interview

A conversation during a career fair can be considered a screening interview. It is generally, 2-10 minutes in length with a human resources representative or a technical manager in your field. If mutual interest is established, it is likely you will be invited for further interviews.

Because your meeting is brief, you will need to make an immediate positive impression. Research the employer and be prepared to match your background and interests to their needs.

Site interview

The site interview takes place at the employer's site. It is a selection interview, following a successful screening interview (phone, career fair, on-campus). This is very good news for you since you are now 50% closer to a job offer. There is however, still work to do!

Clarify the details of the visit in advance (date, location, length of visit, travel arrangements, suggested attire, expenses.) You may be scheduled for a half or full day of interviews, which may include a meal, a tour of the facility, and an overnight stay.

To prepare for a site visit, conduct in-depth research on the employer and their location. Dress professionally and arrive 15-20 minutes early. Bring ten copies of your resume, reference list (graduating students), and unofficial transcript. If you have a portfolio or sample of your work, bring it with you.

Behavioral Interviewing (Behavior Based Interviewing or Structured Interviews)

A structured interview is a type of interview that is utilized by many larger organizations.
This interview is especially popular when there is more than one of the same position
available within the organization. In a structured interview every applicant for the
position is asked the same questions as every other applicant applying for the position. A
structured interview may contain standard interview questions, behavioral interview
questions, or a combination of the two.
"Information Interviewing" is a technique used to explore and research occupations and organizations. Information interviewing is discussed in nearly all career planning and job search books as a strategy that works. It involves talking with people who are in an occupation you are considering, potential employers, or simply contacts who may help provide information or further contacts for you. Information interviewing has several benefits, including:

* Discovering "first hand" information about an occupation. Reference books can provide facts about an occupation, such as salary and demand, but information interviews provide a personalized perspective of an occupation or job.
* Access to the "hidden" job market. Only 20% of all job openings are advertised! Direct contact and networking is essential to finding out about unadvertised job openings. Information Interviewing is not a job interview, but it can be a helpful first step in eliciting information about a prospective employer.
* Improvement of self-confidence and interviewing skills.

This handout explains how to set up and conduct an information interview. The more prepared you are for an information interview, the more you will get out of it!

Case Interviews

Certain employers-especially management consulting firms-use what is known as a "case interview" to determine how well suited you are to their type of work. Case interviews are used to measure your problem solving ability, your tolerance for ambiguity, and your communication skills along several dimensions. Firms want to know how well you identify, structure, and think through problems. They also want to see how well you listen, summarize and articulate your conclusions, and think on your feet. Consequently, your approach to a case is more important than the specific content of your answers. Thinking out loud as you attempt to "crack" a case is advisable because it allows the interviewer to evaluate your thought process.

In a case interview, you are introduced to a business dilemma facing a particular company (often drawn from the interviewer's professional experience). You are asked to analyze the situation, identify key business issues, and discuss how you would address the problems involved. The interviewer begins by giving you some basic facts and then asks you an open-ended or specific question. The interview proceeds as an open dialogue between you and the interviewer, with the interviewer guiding the discussion as you ask probing questions to uncover key information and move toward resolution.

Sample case: "You are called in by Pizza Hut to help them develop a strategy for entering the home delivery market in which Domino's has the dominant position. As lead consultant on this project, what would you do?"

Your first challenge is to identify the type of problem the case addresses and decide whether there is an appropriate framework (e.g., growth tree, value chain, 4 P's and 3 C's of marketing, financial statement, Porter's 5 Forces, etc.,) to structure your analysis. These frameworks are derived from a business curriculum. Begin by identifying the key business issues to show you understand the big picture. Then push deeper into each issue, starting with the most important first.

The above case is primarily a marketing case. The issues to raise include:

* the success factors in the business, and Pizza Hut's vs. Domino's relative strengths or weaknesses; based on that analysis should Pizza Hut enter the business?
* the customers Pizza Hut should target and the needs of those customers
* the product(s) Pizza Hut should sell and the prices they should charge
* how Domino's or other relevant competitors (are there any?) might respond
* what effects a new delivery business will have on Pizza Hut's existing business
* how the business should be structured to minimize costs.

As the discussion progresses, listen carefully and clarify anything you don't understand before proceeding. Follow the interviewer's lead. Each individual will have a unique personal interviewing style, and take you through the case in different ways depending on his or her priorities.

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lino said...

hi ma'am its lino


nformational interview

is and how it can help with your career. Plus how to set up an informational interview and questions to ask.


Informational interview


Skillfully used, an informational interview is one of the most valuable sources of occupational information. While it may cover some of the same ground as printed material or on a company website, it presents opportunities for an intimate and flexible inside view of a job field unmatched by other sources. The informational interview communicates the first hand experiences and impressions of someone in the occupation, and is directed by your questions.

An informational interview is less stressful for both you and the employer than a typical job interview. You are the one in control. Questions can be asked that may not be strategic during a first interview (i.e., questions regarding salary, benefits, vacation). You can discuss what is done on a day-to-day basis and relate it to your own interests and feelings. Beyond the advantages of gaining valuable career information, the informational interview provides the opportunity to build self-confidence and to improve your ability to handle a job interview.

You should regard each interview as a business appointment and conduct yourself in a professional manner. If you have made clear, in advance, the explicit purpose of your interview you will, in all probability, find your contact an interested and helpful person. Remember the appointment time and appear promptly for your interview. You should neither be too casually dressed nor overdressed. Regular business attire is appropriate. Be sure you know the name of the person you are meeting, the correct pronunciation of his/her name, and the title of his/her position.

Because so much ground may be covered in the informational interview, individuals sometimes take notes during the meeting. A limited amount of note-taking is justified provided that your contact is agreeable and that you don't interrupt communication between the two of you.



Occupational Questions:

1. What is the title of the person you are interviewing?

2. What are other commonly-used titles for the position?

3. What are the duties performed during a typical day? Week? Month? Year? Does s/he have a set routine? (As the person describes the duties, ask what skills are needed). How much variety is there on a day-to-day basis?

4. What educational program is recommended as preparation? (Distinguish between courses which are desirable and those which are indispensable.)

5. What kinds of courses are most valuable in order to gain skills necessary for success in this occupation? (Distinguish between courses which are desirable and those which are indispensable.)

6. What degree or certificate do employers look for?

7. What kind of work/internship experience would employers look for in a job applicant?

8. How can a person obtain this work experience?

9. Are any co-curricular activities recommended?

10. What steps besides meeting educational and experiential requirements are necessary to "break into" this occupation? (i.e. - exam? interview? union membership?)

11. What are the important "key words" or "buzz words" to include in a resume or cover letter when job hunting in the field?

12. What are opportunities for advancement? To what position? Is an advanced degree needed? (If so, in what discipline?)

13. Which skills are most important to acquire? (i.e. - which skills do employers look for?)

14. What are the main or most important personal characteristics for success in the field?

15. What are the different settings in which people in this occupation may work (i.e. - educational institutions, businesses, etc.)?

16. What other kinds of workers frequently interact with this position?

17. Is there evidence of differential treatment between men and women workers with respect to job duties, pay, and opportunities for advancement?

18. What are the employment prospects in the advisor’s geographic area? Where are the best employment prospects? What are the employment prospects at the advisor’s company? Is mobility a necessary factor for success?

19. What are some related occupations?

20. What are the different salary ranges?

21. Does the typical worker have a set schedule (i.e. - 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.) or are the hours flexible?

22. What are the demands and frustrations that typically accompany this type of work?

23. Is there a typical chain of command in this field?

24. How can you determine that you have the ability or potential to be successful in this specific occupation?

25. Is this a rapidly growing field? Is it possible to predict future needs for workers in this field?

26. What types of technology are used and how are they used?

27. Where might job listings be found?

28. What entry level positions are there in this field that a liberal arts graduate might consider?

29. What does the advisor know now which would have been helpful to know when s/he was in your shoes?


Functional Questions:

1. How many hours does the advisor work?

2. What sort of education does the advisor have?

3. What has been the advisor’s career path from college to present?

4. What are the satisfying aspects of the advisor’s work?

5. What are the greatest pressures, strains or anxieties in the work?

6. What are the major job responsibilities?

7. What are the toughest problems and decisions with which the advisor must cope?

8. What are the dissatisfying aspects of the work? Is this typical of the field?

9. How would the advisor describe the atmosphere/culture of the work place?

10. Does the advisor think you left you out any important questions that would be helpful in learning about the job or occupation?

11. Can the advisor suggest others who may be valuable sources of information?


Informational Interviewing - After the Interview

Reflect on the information you gathered and consider issues such as:

1. What is your reaction to the number of hours and type of schedule (set/flexible) described?

2. What do you need to do to make yourself a competitive candidate?

3. Do you think you would be satisfied with the situation your contact described?

4. Do you think you would be dissatisfied with the same thing(s) your contact described as dissatisfying?

5. What is your reaction to the conditions (stress/anxieties) of this occupation? Do you want to deal with them?

6. Have any changes taken place in your opinion of the occupation as a result of your interview?

7. What are the most important new facts and understandings that you have acquired?

8. What misconceptions did you correct?

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Rezel said...

How do you keep up with the latest trends in IT?
By: Rezel Medalla BSITIV-B

---I keep up with the latest trends in IT by searching the net,keep up with reading in books,magazines,etc..that are related in technology...Attend conference,.Forum has a technology interest group that meets several times a year to discuss new technologies.Topics of past meetings included blogging.

Take a class or attend a workshop or training session so you aren't just aware of the latest technologies, but also know how to use them.Conferences are excellent ways to stay informed about new technologies and organize email.

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cEciLLE said...

latest regards with IT career

In today’s workplace it is highly important that technology works effectively and efficiently. Computer and information systems managers play a highly important role in implementing technology within organizations.

The job market for those skilled in information technology is booming. Information technology jobs are readily available for those who are trained to handle them. They do everything from helping to construct important business plans to overseeing network security issues and directing internet operations.

An individual in an information technology job may plan, coordinate and research and/or facilitate the computer related activities of the company. They may also help determine both technical and business goals and make plans to reach these goals.

In order to be successful in this field an understanding of both technology and business practices is needed.

Someone working as an information technology specialist may direct the work of systems analysts, computer programmers, support personnel and many other computer related workers. They will plan and coordinate many activities such as installing and upgrading hardware and software, programming and designing systems, developing computer networks and implementing internet and intranet sites.

They are involved with upkeep, maintenance, and the security of their company’s networks as well as analyzing the company’s computer and information needs from an operational and strategic perspective. They are also required to keep updated on the latest technology and developments to ensure that their company does not fall behind other competitors.

In order to obtain an information technology job, one needs to have a bit of experience in the field. A bachelor’s degree is usually required for those seeking to enter into management positions, although for lower positions vocational or technical schools provide certification.

A master’s degree may be preferred by some employers as well.

Universities offer degrees in management information systems which blend technical subjects with business, accounting and several communications courses. A broad range of skills is required to work in the IT field.

Experience with specific software and technology is helpful. A background in consulting or business management is typically preferred as well. Those entering into management positions should possess a good understand of people, management processes and customer service.

For computer and information systems managers, an advanced knowledge is essential of the technical aspects of information management.

The IT industry has an excellent job outlook for the future. In 2006, there were more than a quarter of a million jobs held in the United States alone in this industry. With the ever growing technology that surrounds information security and other aspects, it is expected that information technology jobs will be even more readily available in the future.

As more research is conducted and more developments are released, the need for specialists in the information technology field will be evident.

This industry provides services that are related to the commercial use of computers including custom computer programming services, computer systems integration design, facilities management, data management and many other related services.

As more people become concerned with the information security within their homes and businesses the need for specialists in the field of information technology will continue to grow substantially.

Those who possess a keen understanding of technology surrounding this field are prime candidates to work in information technology.

Vocational and technical school programs typically take less than a year to complete and college and university studies can take from two to six years depending on the degree required.

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